Skip to Search Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content
Error processing SSI file

Our Impact Community

A premier university is more than just an economic anchor. It is a center for enrichment and enlightenment. UTSA offers programs, guest lectures, political debates and artistic performances throughout the year to better serve students, faculty, staff and the local community.

What UTSA Means for the Community

Economically, UTSA contributes to the community through its 16 Division I athletic programs, the Institute of Texan Cultures, Prefreshman Engineering Program, purchases from Historically Underutilized Businesses and the Institute for Economic Development, in addition to other departments and programs.

  • FootballOpen or Close

    It is estimated that visitors attending UTSA athletic events contribute nearly $12 million to the local economy. This dollar amount is expected to rise tremendously as UTSA begins its football program, the first in the history of the university and the only Division I program in San Antonio.

    The program not only means an increased fan base and a higher competitive division for all UTSA sports, but also comes with a proposed athletic complex estimated to generate $193 million for the local economy.

    NCAA events: UTSA has been the host of the NCAA Final Four a total of four times since 1998, generating millions of dollars for San Antonio and attracting thousands of visitors. The 2008 NCAA Men’s Final Four alone generated more than $47 million for the local economy, and the university hosted the women’s Final Four in 2010.

  • UTSA’s Institute of Texan CulturesOpen or Close

    This one-of-a-kind museum offers unique insight into the history of Texas with emphasis on the South Texas region.

    In 2008, more than 27,000 students from across the state came to the museum to enrich their Texas history curriculum experience.

    The museum’s biggest community event is the Texas Folklife Festival™, which celebrates the state’s rich heritage by showcasing music, food, and arts and crafts from more than 40 cultures.

    This annual three-day event attracts an average of 50,000 visitors to San Antonio.

  • PREPOpen or Close

    UTSA is taking an active role in preparing young students for professional success in the fields of engineering, math and science.

    Research shows that these are important fields for future economic and intellectual growth in the country. As a result, the Prefreshman Engineering Program (PREP) was developed to specifically address the region’s deficiencies in these areas to ensure San Antonio can effectively compete in the future global marketplace.

    More than 1,000 students in grades 6 through 11 participate annually in the eight-week summer program.

  • HUBOpen or Close

    Small and minority-owned businesses make a sizeable contribution to the economic development of San Antonio and the South Texas area.

    In 2008, UTSA purchases totaled in excess of $55 million, with 29.8 percent or $16.5 million obtained from HUB (historically underutilized businesses) vendors. For the sixth time in the past eight years, UTSA ranked among the top 25 state agencies in Texas for spending percentages with HUBs, outperforming the state’s average of 13.5 percent.

  • Institute for Economic DevelopmentOpen or Close

    UTSA’s Institute for Economic Development plays an important role in strengthening the economies of San Antonio, Texas and beyond. The institute provides consulting, training, research and information services annually to more than 30,000 small and medium-sized businesses spanning the Southwest Texas border region.

    Since its founding in 1979, the institute has helped clients gain access to more than $1.6 billion in new capital and assisted in creating 4,565 new businesses and 54,094 new jobs with the retention of an additional 54,089 jobs.

    The institute has helped clients generate $10.2 billion in new sales and contracts and $252 million in new taxes from business growth.

    In 2012, the Institute crossed the direct economic impact threshold of $1.4 billion with $1.006 billion in exports and placement of $330 million in growth capital.

Back to top