Thursday, July 30, 2015

UTSA mechanical engineering students win award for lunar utility cart design

student designers
lunar cart

Top: Lunar utility cart design team (from left) Luis Carlos Salinas, Philip Haberle, William Dunne and Chris Kite
Bottom photo: Lunar cart in collapsed position

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(Dec. 15, 2009)--UTSA mechanical engineering students Luis Carlos Salinas, Chris Kite, William Dunne and Philip Haberle haven't begun their careers yet, but already they have collaborated with NASA to design a lunar utility cart. After building a prototype at a cost of slightly more than $500, the UTSA students were named the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge's fall 2009 Top Design Team.

"NASA plans to return to the moon in 2020, and the astronauts who make that journey will need novel equipment that is adapted to lunar conditions," said John Simonis, senior lecturer in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and one of the team's mentors. "The Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge is one way engineering students can contribute to the development of NASA's new equipment solutions."

The lunar utility cart will allow astronauts to transport 500 earth pounds of cargo, experiments, geology samples and equipment on the rough terrain of the moon. Designed to withstand lunar temperature fluctuations, the cart also is collapsible for space launch and travel and easily operated by one crewmember.

The competition judges were particularly impressed with the cart's six-spoked wheel design. Based on the Mars exploration rovers, the wheels are wide enough to prevent the cart from bogging down in the soft dust on the moon's surface, and casters will allow the wheels to swivel 360 degrees. In the stowed position, the wheels lock.

The self-named Team No Boundaries is composed of four aspiring engineers who designed the lunar utility cart during the two-semester planning and design course sequence required of UTSA mechanical engineering majors. During the first semester, the team worked through ideas about cart shapes and attributes. In the second semester, they refined the design and built a prototype. During the design process, the team worked with NASA fellow and ergonomics expert Robert Trevino.

"Not just anyone gets to work with someone from NASA," said team member Salinas. "He provided a lot of NASA resources that we could use for our project. He helped us visualize how objects on the lunar surface behaved. He provided us a Web site with a whole lot of information about designing devices for space applications."

Team member Kite added, "Dr. Trevino encouraged us to reach forward and design the cart with a caution for an astronaut's ergonomics while staying within the constraints that NASA required. It was his welcoming personality that allowed us to keep on rocking."

The team received tips from UTSA mechanical engineering professor Yesh Singh, who specializes in mechanism design, machine element design, finite element applications in mechanical design and the mechanics of solids.

"Dr. Singh advised us in his areas of expertise," said Salinas. "He knows how materials behave in certain conditions. He advised us on the stress situations that could happen on the lunar surface."

To earn $1,650 in scholarship and other monies, Team No Boundaries bested a group of formidable teams at the design challenge including teams representing Lamar University, Texas A&M University, Texas Tech University and University of Texas at Austin. The Top Design Team award winners will receive a trophy, currently en route from the United Space Alliance. The trophy depicts a space shuttle model with signatures of NASA shuttle astronauts.

"The overwhelming success of our two teams in this important statewide competition is another indicator of the high quality of the mechanical engineering program at UTSA," said Efstathios Michaelides, professor and chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. "Our students have shown that they can compete very well with the best out there and win similar awards."

A possible next step is to visit NASA for "rock yard" field testing.

"We foresee NASA probably using some of the features and ideas in the design," said Salinas. "Dr. Trevino has suggested we take the cart to NASA's rock yard, an artificial lunar surface. We've also given thought to modifying the design for commercial use and patent that design. We'll see what happens."

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Cost of lunar utility cart

Casters: $90.87
Frame: $187.88
Wheels: $35.86 (not including machining cost)
Platform: $69.03
Handle: $97.16
Miscellaneous: $30.48

Total: $511.28

 

 

Did You Know?

UTSA researcher is a star behind the cloud

A revolution in cloud computing is underway, and Ravi Sandhu believes it will be much bigger than the PC and Internet revolutions that have already changed the way we live. Sandhu, director of the UTSA Institute for Cyber Security, says UTSA is taking a leadership role in tackling three fundamental cloud technology problems: how to build and operate the cloud, how to use it profitably for diverse applications and how to keep it secure.

Sandhu, the Lutcher Brown Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security in the College of Sciences, and Ram Krishnan, assistant professor of electrical engineering in the UTSA College of Engineering, are funded by a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to improve cloud security.

Did you know? Sandhu, a world-renowned cybersecurity expert, holds 30 patents, has authored more than 250 papers and been cited more than 30,000 times.

Read More »
Events
July 30, 5 - 7 p.m.

Networking and happy hour with AIA San Antonio's Women in Architecture

Join AIA San Antonio’s Women in Architecture group for their networking and happy hour event, where all design professionals are welcome.
Liberty Bar, 1111 S. Alamo St.

Aug. 1, 9 p.m.

"Inside Peace" documentary screening

This documentary, presented by the San Antonio Film Festival, documents the experience of re-entry after incarceration. The film features Michael Gilbert, associate professor in the department of criminal justice and director of the Office of Community and Restorative Justice program at UTSA.
Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, 100 Auditorium Circle

Aug. 4, 6 - 8 p.m.

Free Teacher Tuesday: Los Tejanos Workshop

Discover resources and strategies for teaching Tejano history and culture and get a special educator's tour of the new long-term exhibit, Los Tejanos.
Institute of Texan Cultures, 801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd.

Aug. 9, 12 - 5 p.m.

Vaquerocation 2015

This cowboy-themed programming, offered in conjunction with Our Kids Magazine's Kidcation Week, gives families the opportunity to visit with cowboy docents, enjoy readings and visit activity tables.
Institute of Texan Cultures, 801 E. Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.

Aug. 22, 6 p.m.

UTSA Alumni Gala

The UTSA Alumni Association hosts this annual gala honoring the Alumna of the Year, Alumnus of the Year and the Alumnus of the Year Lifetime Achievement award winners.
Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort & Spa, 9800 Hyatt Resort Dr.


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