Ewing Halsell Foundation gives $287K for UTSA GE2MS teacher prep program

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(Sept. 30, 2010)--UTSA officials announced today a two-year, $287,050 grant from the San Antonio-based Ewing Halsell Foundation to support the Generating Educational Excellence in Mathematics and Science (GE2MS) program, which recruits and prepares science and math students to become effective educators.

A partnership of the UTSA College of Sciences and College of Education and Human Development, GE2MS features an interdisciplinary curriculum that allows undergraduates to earn teaching credentials while earning math or science degrees. In partnership with San Antonio public school districts, the program gives students a chance to visit classrooms, attend seminars, and network with new and seasoned teachers as they prepare to enter the field.

Through the support of the Ewing Halsell Foundation, up to 50 GE2MS students will receive $3,000 scholarships through the spring 2012 semester to complete student teaching. The funding is critical for many who expect to lose financial aid while they student teach, because the responsibility prohibits them from taking additional courses and enrolling full-time to qualify for financial aid.

Additionally, the foundation's gift will fund:

  • Three education professionals, who will regularly observe and communicate with new and student teachers to ensure they are successful in the classroom
  • A two-day symposium including an iPod Touch for 25 new teachers and classroom technology training
  • 25 new teachers to attend a statewide math and science conference covering an array of topics to strengthen their teaching skills
  • 15 new teachers to take 18 graduate credit hours in a secondary math or science subject, making them eligible to teach dual subject positions, which will become critical in 2011 when San Antonio high schools begin to require seniors to take four years of math or science

"This funding will allow us to develop ourselves and focus on developing our skills in the classroom," said GE2MS student Adam Eannarino. "Many of us have families and kids. Instead of waiting tables or pumping gas in the evenings after our student teaching, this means we get to go home and be parents and spouses."