UC Berkeley historian David Montejano to speak Feb. 10 on Chicano Movement

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UC Berkeley historian David Montejano

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(Feb. 9, 2011)--The UTSA Department of History will host David Montejano, professor of ethnic studies at the University of California at Berkeley, for a presentation "San Antonio, the Chicano Movement and the Conflict Within" at 6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 10 in the Buena Vista Street Building Meeting Assembly Room (1.338) at the UTSA Downtown Campus.

Free and open to the public, Montejano's presentation will be based on his new book, "Quixote's Soldiers: A Local History of the Chicano Movement, 1966-1981." He will discuss the class, generational and gender differences that characterized Mexican American politics of the late '60s and early '70s.

Montejano has worked in higher education for 37 years, teaching undergraduate and graduate classes in political sociology, social change, race and ethnic relations, sociological and historical methods, social movements and borderlands history.

An author of more than 24 books, chapters and journal articles, Montejano was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters in 1995. He received the Pacific Coast Branch Award for Best First Book by the American Historical Association in 1989 and the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize in American History from the Organization of American Historians in 1988.

Montejano received a bachelor's degrees in political science and sociology from the University of Texas at Austin and master's and doctoral degrees in sociology from Yale University.

The UTSA Department of History enhances collective knowledge of the past and teaches students how to develop informed and discerning perspectives on historical occurrences. The department disseminates the benefits of a historical education to multicultural populations in San Antonio, South Texas and beyond and promotes faculty and student research, teaching a comprehensive curriculum in history and American studies.

For more information, contact Rhonda Gonzales at (210) 458-4026.