Friday, August 28, 2015

UTSA, UT Dallas, Purdue share $3 million National Science Foundation grant

Share this Story

(Dec. 7, 2011) -- The University of Texas at San Antonio, University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) and Purdue University announce a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation for new cyber security research. Under the direction of principal investigator Ravi Sandhu, executive director of the UTSA Institute for Cyber Security, Lutcher Brown Endowed Chair in Cyber Security and professor of computer science, the researchers will study assured data provenance, the discipline of computer science concerned with the integrity and privacy of data sources, contents and successive transformations.

Murat Kantarcioglu, associate professor of computer science and director of the UT Dallas Data Security and Privacy Lab, is UT Dallas' principal investigator, and Elisa Bertino, computer science professor and interim director of the Purdue Cyber Center in Discovery Park, is Purdue's principal investigator.

Senior researchers participating in the project include UTSA's Greg White, associate professor of computer science and director of the Center for Infrastructure Assurance and Security, Shouhuai Xu, associate professor of computer science; UT Dallas' Alain Bensoussan, distinguished research professor of operations management and director of the International Center for Decision and Risk Analysis, and Bhavani Thusaisingham, the Louis A. Beecherl Jr. I distinguished professor of computer science and director of the Cyber Security Research Center; and Gabriel Ghinita, a former postdoctoral student of Bertino at Purdue who now is an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

"With the proliferation of data on the Web, the source or provenance of data has become a critical factor in establishing data trustworthiness in a variety of business and scientific disciplines," said Sandhu. "To be useful, provenance data must have high integrity and accuracy. At the same time, provenance data can be confidential and private, so it should only be selectively disclosed, if at all. How do we balance these conflicting goals?"

Over the last decade, there has been significant progress in data provenance techniques and models. However, thus far, there is no overarching, systematic framework for the security and privacy of data provenance.

Researchers from UTSA, UT Dallas and Purdue will develop a comprehensive framework to address the security and privacy challenges of provenance data, allowing society to receive maximum benefits from provenance data with realistic tradeoffs. The project will develop reference architectures, offer provenance-related definitions, recommend ways to implement provenance plans in enterprises and provide a risk management framework to guide application architects, designers and users.

"Data, like an historic painting or piece of literature, can have tremendous value since it is widely used to make policy, medical and other important decisions. So its reliability and authenticity is critical," said Bertino, computer science professor and interim director of the Purdue Cyber Center in Discovery Park and Purdue's principal investigator. "Through this project, our team in Purdue's cyber center will focus on the challenging issues in defining models that can provide context for provenance data, its analysis for scientific applications and how it can be transmitted securely using watermarking techniques. We also hope to advance tools in how provenance data is captured using various computer operating systems and application software, and systems to ensure the data is authentic without compromising confidentiality and privacy."

UT Dallas will build privacy-aware access control policies for provenance data. "At UT Dallas, we will enable policies to protect certain sensitive paths in the flow of provenance," said Kantarcioglu, associate professor of computer science and director of the UT Dallas Data Security and Privacy Lab. "In addition, our group will research data sanitization techniques to limit the disclosure of sensitive data sources due to provenance release, and we will develop a risk management framework for provenance releases."

Ultimately, the research will benefit the community by providing protocols to increase the trustworthiness of data found online, transmitted and processed by computers.

UTSA, UT Dallas and Purdue began collaborating on assured data provenance research through a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives (MURI) project funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. The MURI project enabled the team to develop the preliminaries of a model for assured data provenance, which they then used to apply for NSF funding. The research also offers the universities an opportunity to train graduate students in the theory and practice of data provenance.

------------------------------

About UTSA

The University of Texas at San Antonio is one of the fastest growing higher education institutions in Texas and one of nine academic universities and six health institutions in the UT System. As a multicultural institution, UTSA aims to be a national research university providing access to educational excellence and preparing citizen leaders for the global environment.

UTSA serves nearly 31,000 students in 135 degree programs in the colleges of Architecture, Business, Education and Human Development, Engineering, Honors, Liberal and Fine Arts, Public Policy, Sciences and Graduate School. Founded in 1969, UTSA is an intellectual and creative resource center and a socioeconomic development catalyst for Texas and beyond.

About the University of Texas at Dallas

The University of Texas at Dallas, at the convergence of Richardson, Plano and Dallas in the heart of the complex of major multinational technology corporations known as the Telecom Corridor, enrolls more than 14,500 students. The school's freshman class traditionally stands at the forefront of Texas state universities in terms of average SAT scores. The university offers a broad assortment of bachelor's, master's and doctoral degree programs.

About Purdue University Cyber Center

The cyber center, which was launched in 2005 at Purdue's interdisciplinary research complex Discovery Park, is focused on creating systems and tools to disseminate and preserve scientific and engineering knowledge. Its infrastructure is based on distributed computer information and communication technologies. The center is part of the Purdue initiative called ACCESS -- Advanced Computational Center for Engineering and Sciences -- and works on campus with the Rosen Center for Advanced Computing and the Computing Research Institute.

 

 

Did You Know?

UTSA makes the grade with a strong core curriculum

UTSA prides itself on giving students a well-rounded education. Combining a top-tier academic program with opportunities for personal growth prepares students to compete in a global economy. And that's not all. They learn to be informed and engaged citizens as well. At the heart of that academic program is an award-winning core curriculum.

For four consecutive years, UTSA has received an A-rating from the American Council of Trustees and Alumni for the caliber of its core curriculum. According to ACTA, UTSA requires its students to take six of the seven courses deemed "crucial" to a well-rounded education: composition, literature, U.S. government or history, economics, mathematics and science. Only a handful of other institutions in the U.S. are giving students these tools, which are needed to succeed in careers and the community.

Did you know? UTSA is one of only three Texas institutions and 23 in the United States to receive the highest rating for its core curriculum in the 2014-2015 edition of the ACTA's "What Will They Learn?" report.

Read More »
Events
Aug. 27, 6 - 8 p.m.

25Veinticinco exhibit opening reception

This exhibit includes prints by 25 Latino and Latina artists who worked in collaboration with a master printer in the print studio at the UTSA Department of Art and Art History. It runs through Oct. 12.
Downtown Campus Art Gallery, Durango Building Room 1.122, Downtown Campus

Aug. 28, 12 p.m.

Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Advancing Research and Transformative Practice

This book talk will feature a presentation by the book’s co-editors Anne-Marie Núñez, ELPS associate professor, Sylvia Hurtado, professor at the University of California Los Angeles, and Emily Calderón Galdeano, director of research for Excelencia in Education.
Buena Vista Theater (BV 1.326), Downtown Campus

Sept. 15, 5:30 - 7 p.m.

Changing the Conversation: Recovery Works!

As part of National Recovery Month, a panel of substance abuse practitioners and members of the recovery community will discuss issues related to substance abuse treatment and recovery.
Durango Building 1.124 (DB 1.124), Downtown Campus


Other Calendars
» UTSA Events | » Academic | » Institute of Texan Cultures

Submit an Event


Meet a Roadrunner

Mairin Derk exits the stage for academic life at UTSA

Love of theater, history leads Lee grad to pursue anthropology degree

UTSA's Mission

The University of Texas at San Antonio is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge through research and discovery, teaching and learning, community engagement and public service. As an institution of access and excellence, UTSA embraces multicultural traditions and serves as a center for intellectual and creative resources as well as a catalyst for socioeconomic development and the commercialization of intellectual property - for Texas, the nation and the world.

UTSA's Vision

To be a premier public research university, providing access to educational excellence and preparing citizen leaders for the global environment.

UTSA's Core Values

We encourage an environment of dialogue and discovery, where integrity, excellence, inclusiveness, respect, collaboration and innovation are fostered.

Connect with UTSA News

       


Related Links

Back to Top

2015 © The University of Texas at San Antonio  |  Produced by University Communications and Marketing