UTSA physics student Brian Yust to attend meeting with Nobel laureates

Brian Yust

Brian Yust

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(July 3, 2012) -- Brian Yust, a doctoral student in the UTSA Department of Physics and Astronomy, has been selected to attend the prestigious 62nd Meeting of Nobel Laureates and Students in Lindau, Germany July 1-6. Yust is one of three Texans included among 75 graduate students nationwide and 560 internationally.

The meeting assembles the world's top graduate and post-doctoral students to discuss current topics in physics, exchange ideas, build international networks and gain inspiration from Nobel laureates in their field. The students will attend lectures by the 27 Nobel laureates and participate in discussions on the challenges and future implications of physics research.

"I am really looking forward to this extremely unique opportunity to get viewpoints from physicists across the whole spectrum of research," said Yust. "We will meet Nobel laureates representing astrophysics, biophysics and optics and materials research."

Yust was nominated to attend the meeting by Miguel Yacaman, professor and chair of the UTSA Department of Physics and Astronomy, for the work he is doing in the laser laboratory of UTSA physics professor Dhiraj Sardar. The 30-year-old El Paso native is experimenting with novel nanoparticle fabrication and implementation for biomedical purposes, specifically, making very small, bright nanoparticles for imaging as well as photodynamic therapy for cancer research and biosensors. The lab focuses on imaging, disease therapy and disease detection.

In August, Yust will defend his dissertation and hopes to land a post-doctoral position with the Air Force Research Laboratory at Fort Sam Houston. Yost received a master's degree in physics from Texas State University and a bachelor's degree in physics from Texas A&M University.

The meeting is sponsored by the Mars Corp., which covers the students' travel and other expenses. Since 2009, three UTSA College of Sciences students have attended the Lindau meeting including chemistry students Hector Aguilar and Magaly Salinas.