Wednesday, October 07, 2015


UTSA Microbiologist Karl Klose Teaches Bacterial Genetics in Chile


Classroom in Chile

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(Sept. 18, 2012)--In August, UTSA microbiologist Karl Klose traveled to Valparaíso, Chile, to teach students at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaiso (PUCV)’s Institute of Biology how to genetically manipulate and dissect bacterial pathogens. The training will enhance the students’ study of the pathogenesis and environmental persistence of related bacteria and will ultimately position them to help protect the Chilean salmon industry.

This year, Chile is expected to produce 700,000 tons of salmon. Despite the industry’s significant growth since the mid-1970s, disease outbreaks such as those caused by the bacterium Piscirickettsia salmonis continue to threaten the industry, resulting in significant economic losses. At PUCV, scholars are conducting research focusing on ways to prevent infectious agents from causing diseases in salmon. Like UTSA, PUCV students are highly involved in the research as part of their training.

Klose received a South American Visiting Professorship from the American Society for Microbiology that allowed him to teach a short course in bacterial genetics to 21 students from PUCV and surrounding universities in Temuco and Concepcion. The goal was to help students become proficient in basic techniques that can be applied to bacteria that affect salmon. While there, Klose used the bacterium Vibrio cholerae as a teaching model, an ideal choice because not only is it the cause of the human disease cholera, it is also a marine bacterium related to the bacteria many PUCV scholars are already studying.

Each day, Klose provided a 90-minute lecture followed by a six-hour laboratory session allowing the students to practice the techniques they learned. The syllabus addressed gene disruption, motility and flagellar genes, virulence factor expression and biofilm formation. At the end of the course, Klose taught the students how to adapt the techniques to other bacteria.

Klose believes the partnership will stimulate new types of research at PUCV. The techniques Klose taught the students will be continued in individual laboratories at PUCV. Klose and his Chilean host, Sergio Marshall Gonzalez, also expect to collaborate on microbiology research that would result in funding from the Chilean government and a series of peer-reviewed publications.

“The Chilean economy is extremely dependent on salmon exports, but the industry continues to be challenged by different types of infectious diseases,” said Klose. “By teaching students at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaiso the most updated ways to manipulate bacteria, they are equipped to study the infectious agents that affect salmon, and ultimately develop novel vaccines and therapeutics to help protect the salmon industry.”

Klose is a professor in the UTSA Department of Biology and the South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases. For more than 20 years, he has studied the pathogenesis and persistence of V. cholerae, which is found where there are widespread sanitation problems, particularly in water and food supplies. His research focuses on how the bacterium survives, how it causes disease and how it persists in aquatic environments. Ultimately, Klose and other cholera researchers around the world aim to develop a vaccine to the onset and spread of cholera.



Oct. 7, 6:30 p.m.

The Impact of the 84th Texas Legislative Session on Public Schools: Any Rain in Sight or Are Those Smoke Clouds on the Horizon?

Join the College of Education and Human Development's Center for Educational Leadership, Policy and Professional Development for a discussion about what passed and what didn't in the last legislative session and what it means for Bexar County Public Schools. 
Durango Building Southwest Room (DB 1.124), Main Campus

Oct. 8, 10 a.m.

Graduate Fair

Graduate School representatives from across the country will provide information on options after earning a bachelor's degree. Students, alumni and community members are welcome.
University Center Retama Galleria, Main Campus

Oct. 10, 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.

UTSA CITE Technology Entrepreneurship Boot Camp

Kickstart your career as an entrepreneur at The University of Texas at San Antonio’s Center for Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship (CITE) Technology Entrepreneurship Boot Camp.
Business Building, Richard S. Liu Auditorium (BB 2.01.02), Main Campus

Oct. 14, 5:30 p.m.

Architecture as Rendered Society

The UTSA College of Architecture, Construction and Planning, in partnership with AIA San Antonio’s Latinos in Architecture, presents architect Andrés Jaque, founder of the Office for Political Innovation, an architectural practice dually based in New York and Madrid.
Buena Vista Building, Aula Canaria Lecture Hall (BV 1.328), Downtown Campus

Oct. 20-21, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

SECC Book Sale

Looking for a good read? Shop for yourself or for gifts and help change a life at the same time. Browse and buy children’s stories, novels and more at the 2015 SECC Book Sale.
Sombrilla Plaza, Main Campus

Oct. 27, 11:30 a.m.

Lecture by Composer Larry Groupe

The UTSA Music Department presents Emmy-award winning Composer Larry Groupe. Groupe has composed music for films such as "The Contender," "Straw Dogs" and "Miami Vice," and TV shows such as "Star Trek: The Next Generation," "Ren and Stimpy" and "American Gladiators." Lecture is free and open to the public.
Arts Building (2.03.15-18), Main Campus

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Meet a Roadrunner

Renowned violinist Stan Renard plants roots at UTSA

Performer, conductor will teach multidisciplinary courses in music marketing

Did You Know?

UTSA writes the book on all-digital libraries

As touch screens and e-books demand more and more attention from both casual readers and scholars, many people say the handwriting is on the wall for the printed page.

At UTSA, the handwriting is on the wall for a library that doesn't have any printed books.

Since March 2010, the bookless library in the Applied Engineering and Technology Building has given UTSA students an innovative way to read, research and work with each other to solve problems.

With ultra-modern furniture and a décor featuring desktop computers, scanners and LCD screens, the AET Library is designed to engage students in an online format. But it also offers group study niches and study rooms with whiteboards and glass walls on which students can write. The space encourages teamwork, communications and problem solving for the next generation of scientists and professional engineers.

Did you know? The UTSA AET Library is the nation's first completely bookless library on a college or university campus. It served as a model for Bexar County's first-in-the-nation public bookless library system and one of its branches, the Dr. Ricardo Romo BiblioTech.

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