Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Content

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

Mission Statement

To coordinate the undergraduate curriculum, offer writing and learning communities courses, and provide the academic assessment, support, and direction that students need to successfully complete their educational goals.

The Office of Undergraduate Studies offers students the opportunity to train to become commissioned officers in either the United States Air Force or the United States Army by participating in the Air Force ROTC program or the Army ROTC program, the opportunity to increase their potential for academic success by becoming involved in learning communities, and the opportunity to satisfy degree requirements and develop into skillful writers by taking courses offered by the Writing Program. The Office of Undergraduate Studies also offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Multidisciplinary Studies and the Bachelor of Science degree in Public Health.

Degree Programs


Air Force and Army Reserve Officer Training Corps Programs

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps Program

To obtain a commission as an officer in the United States Air Force, a baccalaureate degree in one of the disciplines offered by UTSA and completion of a Four-Year AFROTC Program is required. The full four-year program may be tailored down to less than four years based on the student’s academic progress and the future needs of the Air Force. For complete details on completing AFROTC in less than four years, contact an Air Force ROTC advisor at (210) 458-4624. Walk-ins are also welcome at NPB 1.220.

Credit for aerospace studies courses may be applied toward a baccalaureate degree, but are generally classified as free electives. There is a maximum number of semester credit hours of aerospace studies that may be applied to the degree requirements for each major. Credit for aerospace studies courses awarded by another accredited college or university is accepted by UTSA as credit, within the same limitations as aerospace studies credit earned at UTSA.

Program Requirements: This program does not require a formal application for admission and consists of 16 semester credit hours of aerospace studies. Any student wishing to participate in the freshman- and sophomore-level courses of Air Force ROTC may enroll for these classes at the same time and in the same manner as for other UTSA courses. The freshman and sophomore courses comprise the General Military Course (GMC). Membership as a cadet in the GMC does not confer any military status or commitment upon the student. During the GMC, students can compete for admission to the Professional Officer Course (POC), which is described below. Cadets in the Four-Year Program attend a paid four-week field training course the summer between their sophomore and junior years.

All students in Air Force ROTC are issued books and uniforms for use in ROTC classes. In addition, all POC students enlist in the Air Force Reserve and receive a monthly subsistence allowance.

A required leadership laboratory graded on a pass/fail basis is conducted in conjunction with all aerospace studies courses. This laboratory offers students the opportunity to learn and practice the skills and techniques required to be an Air Force officer within a realistic Air Force organizational framework. It also provides cadets with opportunities to learn about the conduct of Air Force missions and operations through guest lectures and field trips. Cadets are also required to attend physical fitness training a minimum of two times a week which will help prepare them to pass the required physical fitness test.

Cadets may apply for Air Force ROTC scholarships. Three-and-a-half-, three-, two-and-a-half-, and two-year scholarships are available to cadets who meet the basic minimum requirements (achieving and maintaining a 2.5 grade point average, passing a physical fitness test, and passing a physical. Students with questions are encouraged to come by NPB 1.220 or call an Air Force ROTC scholarship advisor at (210) 458-4624.

Minor in Aerospace Studies



Army Reserve Officer Training Corps Program

To obtain a commission as an officer in the United States Army, students must complete either the Four-Year Program or the Two-Year Program in Military Science and be a full-time student pursuing a baccalaureate or graduate degree in one of the disciplines offered by UTSA.

Credit for military science courses may be applied toward a baccalaureate degree, but mainly as free electives. Each major stipulates a maximum number of hours of military science that may be applied toward the degree requirements. Credit for military science courses awarded by another accredited college or university is accepted by UTSA as credit, within the same limitations as military science credit earned at UTSA.

Four-Year Program: This program consists of 18 semester credit hours of military science courses and is offered in two parts: a Basic Course and an Advanced Training Course. Registration is accomplished at the same time and in the same manner as for other UTSA courses. The Basic Course consists of the first- and second-year courses: MSC 1011, MSC 1021, MSC 2012, and MSC 2022, which are designed for beginning students who want to qualify for entry into the Advanced Training Course and those who may want to try military science without incurring a military commitment. A number of popular and challenging extracurricular activities are associated with these courses. Students can qualify for entry into the Advanced Training Course by completing the Leader’s Training Course, a paid summer internship program.

Students may compress the Basic Course into one academic year with the approval of the professor of military science. The Basic Course may be waived without credit for students with prior military service and/or junior ROTC.

Two-Year Program:This program consists of the Advanced Training Course, which incorporates the last two years of the Four-Year Program. The Advanced Training Course consists of MSC 3013, MSC 3023, MSC 4013, and MSC 4023. It is open only to students who have completed the Basic Course or earned placement credit. The Advanced Training Course is designed to qualify a student for a commission as an officer in the United States Army. Students must complete MSC 3013, MSC 3023, MSC 4013, and MSC 4023 and the 31-day paid leadership developmental advanced course in the summer, usually between the junior and senior years. Courses must be taken in sequence unless otherwise approved by the professor of military science. Students receive a stipend each month during the school year.

The Army ROTC program offers competitive scholarships for up to four years to select students. These scholarships provide tuition, fees, book allowance and a monthly subsistence allowance.

Participation in a leadership laboratory is required in conjunction with all courses. The laboratory provides the opportunity to acquire leadership skills and experiences that will enhance a student’s ability to perform as an Army officer.

All ROTC classes require each enrolled student to participate in physical fitness training and to take the Army Physical Fitness Test each semester.

Students enrolled in Army ROTC courses are furnished, free of charge, complete uniforms, texts, and necessary equipment.

The program requirements for the Basic and Advanced courses are as follows:

MSC  1011  Introduction to Army ROTC
MSC  1021  Introduction to Tactical Leadership
MSC  2012  Foundations of Leadership
MSC  2022  Foundations of Tactical Leadership
MSC  3013  Leading Small Organizations I
MSC  3023  Leading Small Organizations II
MSC  4013  Adaptive Leadership
MSC  4023  Leadership in a Complex World

Minor in Military Management and Leadership



Learning Communities and Freshman Seminar Program

Learning Communities assist freshmen in enhancing their academic and personal success by linking up to three Core Curriculum courses together with a group of 25 freshmen who share a common interest, major, or field of study.

All Learning Communities include a Freshman Seminar course which varies in topic. The focus of this course is to connect students to their peers and faculty while providing academic opportunities such as research projects, writing assignments, and group work. The program not only assists freshmen in making the transition into college but also enhances skills important to succeed in college and beyond.

Writing Program

Writing Program courses are designed to help students become the most proficient writers possible. The writing process is stressed, along with purpose of audience, correctness, research techniques, and visual layout. Developmental Writing is designed to prepare students for success in Freshman Composition. Freshman Composition I focuses on informative academic writing, while Freshman Composition II addresses argument and persuasion. Freshman Composition I and II papers concentrate on use of source material and proper documentation of that material. All of the classes include a minimal oral component, providing time for students to practice and sharpen their oral presentation skills. While individual courses differ, all three courses entail some computer use. These courses prepare students for demands of the academic and professional worlds. In addition, WRC 3013 Writing Strategies for the Pre-law Student and WRC 4123 Topics in Writing further prepare students for careers in which writing is a focus.

Back to Top