Sunday, August 30, 2015

San Antonio researchers garner top awards at inaugural vaccine symposium

winners

From left are SAVE awards recipients Aimee Signarovitz, Rishein Gupta and Christine Lindsay Miller

Share this Story

(Dec. 13, 2012) -- UTSA graduate students Christine Lindsay Miller and Aimee Signarovitz and post-doctoral fellow Rishein Gupta were recognized for outstanding research poster presentations at the inaugural San Antonio Vaccine Development Center (SAVE) Symposium. The symposium, "Vaccine Antigen Discovery and Vaccine-Induced Immunity," was held Nov. 16 at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute.

Miller, Gupta and Signarovitz are all conducting research in the College of Sciences Department of Biology. They received the first, second and third prize, respectively, for their symposium presentations.

Antigens are substances such as bacteria, fungi or pollen that stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies. An antibody is a protein produced by the immune defenses when the harmful antigen is recognized.

Under the direction of Janakiram Seshu, associate professor of microbiology, UTSA cell and molecular biology doctoral student Christine Miller is studying Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The bacterium is carried by ticks and expresses proteins that allow it to quickly adapt to its mammalian host and cause disease.

Scientists have identified the gene expression regulators that allow B. burgdorferi to express the proteins it needs to survive. Miller, however, has found a regulator that turns the genes off, a critical piece of information for the development of a vaccine against Lyme disease. Her poster, "Role of Borrelia burgdorferi Host-Adaptation Regulator (BadR) in the Patho-physiology of the Agent of Lyme Disease," presented her findings.

In 2009, Gupta joined UTSA professor Bernard Arulanandam's laboratory as a post-doctoral researcher to study host immune responses against chlamydial infections and effective intervention techniques. The bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the leading causes of sexually transmitted diseases.

Gupta's poster, "In Vivo Whole Animal Body Imaging Reveals the Possible Contribution of Host Innate Factors in Early Colonization of Chlamydia trachomatis Within the Murine Female Genital Tract," demonstrated how to track fluorescent stained bacteria and monitor their movement inside the body in real-time. He is especially interested in understanding how a hosts immune system may aid the progression of the infection and how to inhibit those processes to develop a vaccine that prevents the infection from spreading.

Signarovitz is a UT Health Science Center student pursuing her doctoral degree in microbiology and immunology. Like Gupta, she researches in Arulanandam's laboratory. Her poster, "Mucosal Immunity from Oral Vaccination Involves Antigen Trafficking By M-cells and Goblet Cells," explores two types of cells involved in oral vaccinations. M-cells are known to remove antigens from intestines. Goblet cells make mucus in intestines and lungs. Using the bacterium Francisella tularensis, which causes the disease tularemia, she is researching ways to affect the body's immune response during vaccination.

The San Antonio Vaccine Development Center, launched in 2012 with assistance from BioMed SA, builds upon the mutual vaccine research resources of four San Antonio institutions: UTSA, UT Health Science Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute and Southwest Research Institute. This month's symposium was the center's inaugural event.

"We were so pleased to see posters presentations of such a high quality at our inaugural symposium," said Bernard Arulanandam, the UTSA Jane and Roland Blumberg Professor of Biology. "Our UTSA students fared very well in a competitive arena. We are so proud of their hard work and the opportunity the symposium gave them to learn about infectious disease research programs beyond their own areas."

>> Learn more at the San Antonio Vaccine Development Center website. Learn more about the UTSA microbiology and immunology programs at the Department of Biology and STCEID websites.

 

 

Did You Know?

UTSA makes the grade with a strong core curriculum

UTSA prides itself on giving students a well-rounded education. Combining a top-tier academic program with opportunities for personal growth prepares students to compete in a global economy. And that's not all. They learn to be informed and engaged citizens as well. At the heart of that academic program is an award-winning core curriculum.

For four consecutive years, UTSA has received an A-rating from the American Council of Trustees and Alumni for the caliber of its core curriculum. According to ACTA, UTSA requires its students to take six of the seven courses deemed "crucial" to a well-rounded education: composition, literature, U.S. government or history, economics, mathematics and science. Only a handful of other institutions in the U.S. are giving students these tools, which are needed to succeed in careers and the community.

Did you know? UTSA is one of only three Texas institutions and 23 in the United States to receive the highest rating for its core curriculum in the 2014-2015 edition of the ACTA's "What Will They Learn?" report.

Read More »
Events
Sept. 12, 11 a.m.

UTSA Football vs. Kansas State

Cheer on the UTSA Roadrunners at their home-opener against the Kansas State Wildcats.
Alamodome, 100 Montana St.

Sept. 15, 5:30 - 7 p.m.

Changing the Conversation: Recovery Works!

As part of National Recovery Month, a panel of substance abuse practitioners and members of the recovery community will discuss issues related to substance abuse treatment and recovery.
Durango Building 1.124 (DB 1.124), Downtown Campus


Other Calendars
» UTSA Events | » Academic | » Institute of Texan Cultures

Submit an Event


Meet a Roadrunner

Mairin Derk exits the stage for academic life at UTSA

Love of theater, history leads Lee grad to pursue anthropology degree

UTSA's Mission

The University of Texas at San Antonio is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge through research and discovery, teaching and learning, community engagement and public service. As an institution of access and excellence, UTSA embraces multicultural traditions and serves as a center for intellectual and creative resources as well as a catalyst for socioeconomic development and the commercialization of intellectual property - for Texas, the nation and the world.

UTSA's Vision

To be a premier public research university, providing access to educational excellence and preparing citizen leaders for the global environment.

UTSA's Core Values

We encourage an environment of dialogue and discovery, where integrity, excellence, inclusiveness, respect, collaboration and innovation are fostered.

Connect with UTSA News

       


Related Links

Back to Top

2015 © The University of Texas at San Antonio  |  Produced by University Communications and Marketing