Tuesday, September 01, 2015

PREP student researches effects of technology on reading comprehension

delatorre

PREP student Celeste De La Torre

Share this Story

(Aug. 4, 2011)--When organizers of the MILSET Expo-Sciences International were handing out awards at the July 18-23 competition in Bratislava, Slovakia, it was apropos that 14-year-old San Antonian Celeste De La Torre received a coffee table book about Slovakia's history and culture as the only special award given in the behavioral sciences category, which included 33 participants from 14 countries. After all, De La Torre, a bibliophile at heart, had just demonstrated that Hispanics achieve better reading comprehension when they use printed textbooks as opposed to electronic readers.

De La Torre began the behavioral sciences project in October 2011 with longtime friend Diane Squire, also an avid reader. Together, they asked a question that few can answer: Do electronic readers have an impact on students' reading comprehension levels?

"When we began our project, we could only find research that tested one e-reader to another," De La Torre said. "We couldn't find anything that tested paper books and e-readers, keeping in mind reading comprehension."

With an initial pool of 62 Hispanic fourth and fifth graders, De La Torre and Squire slowly and methodically whittled their group of test subjects down to two dozen. The teens gave the subjects a variety of passages to read in printed textbooks and on a Kindle. Then they tested their subjects' reading comprehension levels.

The results were staggering. Both the boys and the girls scored significantly better, approximately 20 percent better, on reading comprehension tests for the passages that came from printed textbooks.

De La Torre and Squire qualified for the international science fair in Europe after winning the second grand prize at the Alamo Regional Academy of Science and Engineering (ARASE) Fair at St. Mary's University in San Antonio. They pursued their science project in response to Texas HB 4294, which received strong support in both Texas houses and was signed into law by Texas Governor Rick Perry on June 19, 2009. Among other things, the bill allows school districts to purchase electronic readers in lieu of duplicate sets of printed materials, once they have purchased an initial set of classroom textbooks.

Although De La Torre's findings haven't deterred her from believing technology has a place in the classroom, she advises educators to make the introduction of technology a gradual process for students.

"It's important for students to become as comfortable with e-books as they are with printed books," she said. "Hong Kong is great at using e-books in the classroom. We should study what they do."

De La Torre was one of 1,375 students who participated in the San Antonio Prefreshman Engineering Program this summer, an academically intense summer camp established at UTSA in 1979 to encourage middle and high school students, especially minorities and females, to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). PREP's curriculum teaches abstract reasoning and problem solving skills through lectures, seminars and hands-on activities that allow students to learn and apply advanced STEM concepts.

Applications for PREP's 2012 summer program will be available in November. Watch the PREP USA website for details.

 

 

Did You Know?

Football standouts make Roadrunner history

For Ashaad Mabry and Triston Wade, football is not just a passing fancy. Both players were part of the UTSA football program almost from the beginning. When UTSA opens the 2015 season Thursday at Arizona, it will be the first time the Roadrunners take the field without them. But Mabry and Wade will still be playing football; their uniforms will just be a different color.

Mabry, a defensive tackle from San Antonio's MacArthur High School, was an honorable mention All-Conference USA selection his final two seasons as a Roadrunner and second among the team's defensive linemen with 49 tackles last year. Wade, a defensive back from Tyler, was the most decorated player in school history. He was a semifinalist for the 2014 Jim Thorpe Award – for the nation's top defensive back – a three-time all-conference honoree and two-year team captain who set a school record of 293 tackles in his career. Both men had outstanding college careers that allowed them to make UTSA history.

Did you know? Mabry and Wade both agreed to terms as undrafted free agents with the New Orleans Saints and Seattle Seahawks, respectively, becoming the first UTSA players to move to the professional ranks.

Read More »
Events
Sept. 7, All Day

Labor Day Holiday

All campuses will be closed for the Labor Day holiday.
All Campuses

Sept. 12, 11 a.m.

UTSA Football vs. Kansas State

Cheer on the UTSA Roadrunners at their home-opener against the Kansas State Wildcats.
Alamodome, 100 Montana St.

Sept. 15, 5:30 - 7 p.m.

Changing the Conversation: Recovery Works!

As part of National Recovery Month, a panel of substance abuse practitioners and members of the recovery community will discuss issues related to substance abuse treatment and recovery.
Durango Building 1.124 (DB 1.124), Downtown Campus

Sept. 24, 6 p.m.

The Power of Story in the Landscape of Memory and Identity

The UTSA College of Education and Human Development will host award-winning children’s author and illustrator Yuyi Morales. Morales will share personal stories that have influenced her work as an author and illustrator.
Buena Vista Building Aula Canaria (BV 1.328), Downtown Campus


Other Calendars
» UTSA Events | » Academic | » Institute of Texan Cultures

Submit an Event


Meet a Roadrunner

Mairin Derk exits the stage for academic life at UTSA

Love of theater, history leads Lee grad to pursue anthropology degree

UTSA's Mission

The University of Texas at San Antonio is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge through research and discovery, teaching and learning, community engagement and public service. As an institution of access and excellence, UTSA embraces multicultural traditions and serves as a center for intellectual and creative resources as well as a catalyst for socioeconomic development and the commercialization of intellectual property - for Texas, the nation and the world.

UTSA's Vision

To be a premier public research university, providing access to educational excellence and preparing citizen leaders for the global environment.

UTSA's Core Values

We encourage an environment of dialogue and discovery, where integrity, excellence, inclusiveness, respect, collaboration and innovation are fostered.

Connect with UTSA News

       


Related Links

Back to Top

2015 © The University of Texas at San Antonio  |  Produced by University Communications and Marketing