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4. Academic Regulations - Undergraduate Students

Registration Procedures

Orientation

All new freshmen and freshman-transfer students with 0 to 29 semester credit hours are required to participate in new student orientation. These students are not allowed to register for classes without first attending orientation. Although not required, a Transfer Roundup program is strongly recommended for transfer students with 30 or more semester credit hours. Orientation and Family Programs (OFP) assists UTSA’s freshmen, freshman-transfer, and transfer students by conducting new student orientation seminars called “Roadrunner Roundup.” Roadrunner Roundup gives students the opportunity to meet with an academic advisor and register for classes, as well as learn about campus services, resources, and student activities.

Graduation Expectations

The State of Texas, The University of Texas System, and The University of Texas at San Antonio are concerned about the excessive number of years that today’s students spend in institutions of higher education pursuing undergraduate degrees. UTSA is seeking ways to encourage students to graduate in a timely manner by considering certain incentives and removing needless barriers.

UTSA expects students to graduate in a timely fashion and strongly encourages its undergraduates to set their goals to complete their baccalaureate degrees in four years, or if that is not feasible, in no more than six years. Students who make small sacrifices now to devote as much attention as possible to their academic endeavors in order to achieve timely graduation will realize significant benefits in the future. Students should contact their undergraduate advising center to discuss the benefits of timely graduation.

Academic Advising

UTSA views sound academic advising as a significant responsibility in educating its students. Employing developmental advising principles, UTSA academic advisors offer academic advising and guidance to empower students to realize their full potential.

Many individuals within the UTSA community contribute to the advising process, including faculty mentors and professional staff academic advisors. Students are encouraged to develop mentoring relationships with faculty for additional information and support.

Students are ultimately responsible for knowing and meeting degree requirements, for enrolling in appropriate courses to ensure orderly and timely completion of their degree programs, and for following the rules and policies of UTSA as found in the catalog, the current UTSA Information Bulletin, and the online schedule of classes. Each advising center sees students concerning all matters related to their academic status, such as progress toward degree completion, graduation status, academic warning, academic probation, academic dismissal, and changing majors. Students who are on academic warning or academic probation for the first time or who are reinstated after academic dismissal or with a Texas Success Initiative (TSI) deficiency are required to be advised, and holds are placed on their registration records to ensure that the student meets with the advisor. Students may also be required to meet with an advisor to obtain approval to register for restricted courses.

Frequent advisor contact provides students with current academic information and promotes progress toward educational goals. All students, regardless of classification or major, accepted into the Honors College are advised through the Honors College. Freshmen (fewer than 30 earned semester credit hours) who have declared majors are advised in the Colleges’ Freshman Advising Center (CFAC). Freshmen and continuing students who are undecided and those who are provisional are advised in the Tomás Rivera Center (TRC). Students who have earned 30 or more semester credit hours and have declared majors are advised through the college advising center of the student’s major, with the exception of those accepted into the Honors College. On the UTSA Downtown Campus, freshmen through seniors with declared majors are advised through the Downtown Undergraduate Advising Center, and students who have not decided upon a major or have a provisional status are advised through the Downtown Tomás Rivera Center. Special students who are non-degree-seeking undergraduates and continuing students who have declared a major in Multidisciplinary Studies are advised through the office of Undergraduate Studies Support and Technology Services.

Students may need to consult with advisors in the Athletics program, secondary teacher certification, Health Professions Office, or another college advising center if they are student-athletes, are seeking teacher certification at the secondary level, are pursuing a career in the health professions, or are seeking majors or minors outside their primary majors.

All UTSA undergraduates are required to meet with their academic advisors no later than the first semester of their sophomore year and develop filed degree plans showing semester-by-semester course selections and expected graduation dates. A registration hold will be placed on the records of each undergraduate who has earned 45 or more semester credit hours and has not met with an advisor and filed a degree plan with an anticipated graduation date. Undergraduates are expected to meet with their advisors regularly to update their filed degree plans to ensure timely progress toward graduation.

In addition, students are required to meet with their academic advisors to complete a pregraduation degree audit before they meet 90 semester credit hours. The pregraduation audit is intended to inform the student about which courses are still needed to graduate, ensure that all courses needed for graduation are included in the student’s filed degree plan, and identify required prerequisites which are missing and whether scheduling accommodations are necessary. Holds will be placed on the records of each undergraduate who has earned 90 or more semester credit hours but has not completed a pregraduation degree audit.

Undergraduates are urged to monitor their progress toward their degrees by using the online degree evaluation system available through ASAP (Automated Student Access Program). The Curriculum Advising and Program Planning (CAPP) system is the degree auditing/checking system within Banner. Students are able to run a degree evaluation in the Student Services area of ASAP.

Registration for Classes

Students who attend classes at UTSA must be officially registered or approved to audit a course. Registration instructions are online each semester in ASAP. Questions regarding registration should be directed to the Enrollment Services Center or the Office of the Registrar.

UTSA does not guarantee the availability of particular courses or sections, and admission to classes is permitted only until the maximum number of students allowable in any section has been reached. UTSA reserves the right to cancel any course or section in which the number of registrants does not warrant its continuation.

A student is not permitted to register for classes offered in two consecutive time periods on different campuses, one at the Main Campus and the other at the Downtown Campus, unless there is at least a 40-minute period of time between the end of the first class and the beginning of the second class or the student has received special permission from the Dean of the college of his or her major to register for the two consecutive classes.

Late Registration

Late registration permits students who have been admitted to UTSA to register for classes during an allotted time just prior to and at the beginning of the semester as indicated in the online registration calendar each semester. Since many courses will have been closed at capacity, late registrants may need to select their courses from a reduced schedule. Students are not permitted to register after the close of the late registration period, except in extenuating circumstances. See the section “Adding Courses After Late Registration.”

Adding Courses After Late Registration

Adding a course after the Late Registration period requires the approval of the course instructor and the chair of the department offering the course. After the Census Date in any semester, students may not add courses except in extremely rare and extenuating circumstances as approved by the Dean of the college offering the course and by the Dean of University College for undergraduate courses.

Appeals to add a course after Census Date must have final approvals and be processed through Enrollment Services no later than one month after Census Date for long Fall and Spring semesters or one week after Census Date for shorter terms of Summer, Fall and Spring semesters. For information on Census Date and deadlines for adding classes, students should refer to the Academic Calendar or the registration calendar online each semester.

Enrollment in Graduate Courses

For Undergraduate Credit

An undergraduate student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher may enroll in graduate courses and apply the credits earned to an undergraduate degree after obtaining approval from the student’s advisor, the instructor, the Graduate Advisor of Record, and the Dean of the college in which the course is offered. Approval forms are available in the deans’ offices, the Enrollment Services Center, and on the Office of the Registrar Web site at http://utsa.edu/registrar/. All approvals must be obtained and the form filed by the time of registration. Students are encouraged to begin collecting the appropriate authorizations before the start of the registration period.

For Graduate Credit

An undergraduate student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and lacking no more than 12 semester credit hours for graduation may enroll in a graduate course and earn graduate credit under the following conditions:

  1. All hours required for the student’s undergraduate degree must be completed in the term in which the graduate course is being taken.
  2. In order to earn graduate credit, the student must graduate at the end of the semester in which the course(s) is taken; otherwise, the course(s) count as undergraduate credit.
  3. If graduate credit is earned, the semester credit hours are not considered part of the baccalaureate degree program.
  4. The student must obtain permission from the student’s advisor, the instructor, the Department Chair and the Dean of the college in which the course(s) to be taken is offered. Approval forms are available in the deans’ offices, the Enrollment Services Center, and on the Office of the Registrar Web site at http://utsa.edu/registrar/. The form must be filed by the time of registration. Students are encouraged to begin seeking appropriate authorizations before the registration period.

An undergraduate student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and lacking no more than 30 semester credit hours for graduation may enroll in a graduate course and earn graduate credit under the following conditions:

  1. The student is in good academic standing in an accelerated bachelor/master’s degree program or is in good academic standing in the Honors College.
  2. If graduate credit is earned, the semester credit hours are not considered part of the baccalaureate degree program.
  3. The student must obtain permission from the student’s advisor, the instructor, the Graduate Advisor of Record, and the Dean of the college in which the course(s) to be taken is offered. Approval forms are available in the deans’ offices, the Enrollment Services Center, and on the Office of the Registrar Web site at http://utsa.edu/registrar/. The form must be filed by the time of registration. Students are encouraged to begin seeking appropriate authorizations before the registration period.

Maximum Hours of Enrollment in Summer Terms

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board sets limits on the number of semester credit hours in which a student may enroll during a semester where the courses are offered in a shortened format. Therefore, students may enroll in no more than 3 semester credit hours in a three-week summer term, no more than 4 semester credit hours in a four-week summer term, no more than 6 semester credit hours in a five-week summer term, and no more than 12 semester credit hours in a ten-week summer term. In particular, a student may enroll in no more than 3 semester credit hours in the May Mini-mester.

A student may enroll in no more than 15 semester credit hours during an entire Summer Semester, regardless of the combination of terms.

Undergraduate Credit Limitation

Section 54.014 of the Texas Education Code was amended during the 76th legislative session to allow institutions of higher education to charge a higher tuition rate to resident students for semester credit hours attempted in excess of 45 semester credit hours above those required for completion of a degree program. The law applies only to new undergraduate resident students beginning in Fall 1999 or later. The 79th legislative session reduced the semester-credit-hour limitation to 30 semester credit hours for all new undergraduate resident students who enroll for the first time in Fall 2006 or thereafter.

The 45 (or 30) hours include courses which are repeated, duplicated, or courses for which the student received a grade of “W.” Although the law allows some exclusions, hours for courses passed, failed, withdrawn, and dropped are counted in the 45 (or 30) hours if the student took them while paying resident tuition at a public institution in Texas. Students are encouraged to seek academic advising and to follow the official degree plan in the approved catalog of graduation.

Resident undergraduate students who initially enrolled during or after the Fall 1999 Semester and who enroll in courses in excess of 45 semester credit hours above those required for completion of their degree program will be assessed an additional charge of $121 per semester credit hour. Effective Fall 2006, all new undergraduate resident students will be assessed the higher tuition rate for semester credit hours attempted in excess of 30 semester credit hours above those required for completion of a degree. Students with questions or who wish to appeal this policy due to extenuating circumstances should contact their advising center.

Three-Attempt Rule

The Texas Legislature enacted legislation that does not allow universities to receive state funding for courses containing the same content attempted by a student more than twice at the same Texas state-supported institution of higher education. This regulation not only includes completing a class more than twice, but also includes classes where grades of “W” were earned by withdrawing from classes or dropping a class after the official semester Census Date (see the online registration calendar for specific Census Dates for each semester).

There is now a monetary benefit if students complete classes prior to the third attempt; therefore, it is imperative that students make every effort to complete courses successfully the first time. Upon the third or subsequent attempt to take the same course at UTSA, a surcharge per semester credit hour will be assessed by UTSA for courses that fall into this category. This surcharge will be in addition to the regular in-state per semester credit hour tuition rate. Current tuition, fees, and charges schedules can be accessed on the Fiscal Services Web site. The three-attempt rule applies to all undergraduate students; however, out-of-state students who pay the out-of-state rate would not be subject to the surcharge; out-of-state students with fee waivers or who are exempt from paying the out-of-state rate would be assessed the surcharge at the same rate as in-state students.

The Texas Legislature has mandated that students be held accountable for any courses they have taken beginning with the Fall 2002 Semester (this means that the “course count” begins with courses taken or dropped after Census Date beginning with the Fall 2002 Semester). However, certain classes will be exempt from this rule, such as independent study, special topics courses with differing content, and developmental and remedial courses up to the 18-semester-credit-hour limit established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (19 Texas Administrative Code, § 13.106). Students who, in their final semester or term prior to graduation, must repeat one or more previously completed courses for the third or more times in order to meet graduation requirements, will be exempt from paying higher tuition for the repeated course(s) only in the semester or term prior to graduation and shall be permitted the exemption from paying higher tuition for the repeated course(s) for only one semester. Those students wishing to apply for this exemption need to go through the appeal process described below.

Undergraduate students wishing to appeal a charge because of the three-attempt rule may complete an appeal form available in the college advising centers for undergraduate students.

Dropping Courses

Undergraduate students may drop courses from their schedules for a limited time each semester. The online registration calendar for each semester indicates the deadlines for students to drop courses.

Courses officially dropped before the Census Date do not appear on a student’s transcript. See the online registration calendar each semester for the Census Dates.

Students who drop courses between the Census Date and the Automatic “W” Date have a record of the courses on their transcripts with an automatic grade of “W.”

Automatic “W” Date for Undergraduate Students

Fall or Spring Semesters

No later than the third class day preceding final examinations.

Summer Terms

No later than the third class day preceding final examinations. See the online registration calendar each Summer Semester for the dates for different parts of the term.

It is the student’s responsibility to drop a course by the appropriate deadline. If a student fails to drop a course, even if the student does not attend the course, he or she will receive a grade of “F” in the class.

Faculty and staff will not drop a student from a course automatically for nonattendance; the student must initiate the process and complete any necessary steps to ensure that the class is dropped.

Students may be administratively dropped from courses for failure to attend certain laboratory courses in the first class week, for failure to attend or participate in developmental courses, for failure to complete course prerequisites prior to the start of the semester, or when courses are canceled. Students cannot assume, however, that they will be automatically dropped from any class for failure to attend or failure to pay tuition and fees. Students are responsible for checking their schedules on ASAP and for checking their myUTSAmail e-mail accounts or their preferred e-mail accounts designated in ASAP to determine if they have been dropped from a class.

After the Automatic “W” Date, an undergraduate student may not drop a course except with the approval of the Dean of the college in which the course is offered and then only for urgent and substantiated, nonacademic reasons. Students who want to drop all classes after the semester begins should refer to the section “Withdrawal from the University” in this chapter.

Refer to the sections “Undergraduate Credit Limitation” and “Three-Attempt Rule” in this chapter for information about the financial consequences of receiving “W” grades.

Six-Drop Policy

Effective Fall 2007, the legislated and enacted six-drop policy limits each student to drop no more than six courses throughout his or her undergraduate college career at Texas public institutions of higher education. Under Section 51.907 of the Texas Education Code, “an institution of higher education may not permit a student to drop more than six courses, including any course a transfer student has dropped at another institution of higher education.”

The statute applies to students who enroll in a public institution of higher education as first-time undergraduates in Fall 2007 or later. Any course that a student drops is counted toward the six-course limit if:

  1. the student was able to drop the course without receiving a grade or incurring an academic penalty (for courses taken at UTSA, this means the student was able to drop the course without receiving a grade of “A+,” “A,” “A-,” “B+,” “B,” “B-,” “C+,” “C,” “C-,” “D+,” “D,” “D-,” “F,” “CR,” “NC,” or “IN,” but did receive a grade of “W” for the course which results in no academic penalty);
  2. the student’s transcript indicates or will indicate that the student was enrolled in the course; and
  3. the student is not dropping the course in order to withdraw from the institution.

This would not include courses dropped before the semester begins or before the Census Date.

There are exemptions that may allow a student to drop a course without having it count against the six-drop limit, but it is the student’s responsibility to demonstrate good cause. A Student Petition for a Course Drop Exemption to the Six-Drop Policy form may be obtained from the student’s academic advising center. Students who petition for an exemption are encouraged to do so as soon as possible after dropping the course for which the exemption is requested.

This statute applies across Texas public institutions, and procedures for implementation may vary among institutions. A UTSA student affected by this statute that has attended or plans to attend another institution of higher education should become familiar with that institution’s policies on dropping courses.

Auditing Courses

UTSA students and nonstudents who wish to audit a course may do so with the approval of the instructor and the chair of the department in which the course is offered, provided there is space in the classroom after all registered students have been accommodated. The minimum enrollment in a course must be reached without auditors.

Auditing entitles a student to listen and observe. Participation of an auditor in class is at the discretion of the instructor. No UTSA credit is granted for courses that are audited; no official record is made of enrollment in classes on an audit basis. Due to the format of studio/laboratory use, auditors are not approved for art courses. Students not enrolled in courses at the University are not allowed to audit courses that require the use of the University computing system, with the exception of the Learning Management System (i.e., Blackboard).

All auditors must submit an Audit Course Form to the Enrollment Services Center. A UTSA student pays an auditing fee of $25 per course. Auditors who are not registered UTSA students must pay an auditing fee of $50 per course. Persons over 65 years of age are permitted to audit without paying an auditing fee.

Permission to audit must be obtained and fees paid beginning the first day of class through the Census Date. Students who register for a course and later want to change the course to an audit must officially drop that course before submitting an Audit Course Form.

Nonstudent auditors who want library privileges may receive them by completing a Friends of the UTSA Library application at the circulation desk in the UTSA Library and paying a nonrefundable fee. There are limits on the services offered to the Friends of the UTSA Library cardholders; further details are available from the circulation desk.

Nonstudent auditors who want UTSA parking privileges must register their vehicles and purchase a parking permit. To purchase a parking permit, nonstudent auditors should go to the University Parking Division office with their validated Audit Course Form.

Cancellation of Enrollment

Students who fail to fulfill admission, registration, or financial requirements or who otherwise fail to adhere to academic regulations may have their enrollment for the semester canceled. Students may apply for readmission for a subsequent semester provided they have resolved the cause of cancellation.

Withdrawal from the University

Undergraduate students, other than athletes and international students, who find it necessary to withdraw from the University may do so via ASAP during long Fall and Spring semesters. During Summer terms, all students must submit a withdrawal form to Enrollment Services. The withdrawal form is available at http://utsa.edu/registrar. Athletes who wish to withdraw from the University must contact the Office of Academic Services in the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics; international students who wish to withdraw from the University must contact the Office of International Programs.

Undergraduate students who officially withdraw from the University after Census Date receive grades of “W” in all classes. Undergraduates may not withdraw from the University later than the third class day preceding final examinations in the Spring and Fall semesters.

Refer to the sections “Undergraduate Credit Limitation” and “Three-Attempt Rule” in this chapter for information about the financial consequences of receiving “W” grades.

Students who withdraw from all classes are subject to the University’s academic probation and dismissal regulations. Students withdrawing should refer to the regulations on refunds of tuition and fees, readmission policies, and requirements for maintaining registration.

Withdrawal for Military Service

A student who withdraws as a result of being called to active military service may choose (1) to receive a refund of tuition and fees for the semester; (2) if eligible, to be assigned an incomplete (IN) in each course (refer to section “Explanation of Credit, Grading System, and Symbols” in this chapter); or (3) at the instructor’s discretion, to receive a final grade in courses where he or she has completed a substantial amount of coursework and has demonstrated sufficient mastery of the course material.

As a benefit to those students who withdrew from the University to perform military service (not including Texas National Guard Training exercises) and have not attended another institution long enough to receive grades, UTSA will not require them to requalify for admission. In order to take advantage of this benefit, the students must request readmission from the Office of the Registrar within one year of being released from active military service, and submit in writing a statement indicating he/she did not attend another university during this time period. Returning students who have attended another institution long enough to receive grades, must reapply to the University. A returning student may be eligible for the same financial assistance provided before the student’s withdrawal.

Medical Withdrawal from the University

Students are advised to contact Student Health Services for more information at (210) 458-4142.

Mental Health Withdrawal from the University

Students are advised to contact Counseling Services for more information at (210) 458-4140.

English Language Assessment Procedure

The English Language Assessment Procedure (ELAP) is a mandatory UTSA assessment for incoming international students whose Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores are between 500 and 600 (paper version) or 61 and 100 (Internet version). ELAP tests academic language skills in the areas of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The test is administered during orientation week at no charge to the student. A registration hold is placed on students until the test is successfully completed.

Students who are required to take English for International Students (EIS) classes and do not register for them or drop them before they are successfully completed will be withdrawn from the University and will jeopardize their visa status. Once students successfully complete the EIS classes, the registration hold is removed from their record.

Texas Success Initiative

The Texas Success Initiative (TSI) is a program designed to ensure college readiness of students entering Texas public institutions of higher education. Entering undergraduate students, unless exempt, must take a TSI approved assessment test to determine their readiness to enroll in college-level academic coursework. For those students who are not yet ready to enroll in that coursework, the University must provide advising and educational support necessary to assist them in achieving college success.

The University offers developmental education courses in certain academic areas for students with deficiencies as identified by approved assessment instruments. Developmental education courses cannot be used as degree credit. All developmental education courses are graded on a credit/no-credit basis and will not be included in the student’s grade point average. More information regarding the Texas Success Initiative may be found in the academic advising centers and on the Texas Success Initiative Web site (http://utsa.edu/success/tsi.html).

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Records and Classification of Students

Classification

UTSA undergraduate students are classified according to the following table:

Classification Terms Number of Semester
Credit Hours Earned
Upper-division Senior 90 or more
Junior 60 to 89
Lower-division Sophomore 30 to 59
Freshman 0 to 29

Time Status Terms

Undergraduate Time Status Number of Credit Hours Enrolled Per Fall,
Spring, or Entire Summer Semester
Full time 12 or more semester credit hours
Three-quarter time 9 to 11 semester credit hours
Half time 6 to 8 semester credit hours
Less-than-half time Fewer than 6 semester credit hours

Verification of Enrollment and Degree

UTSA student enrollment and degree verifications are reported by the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). For students on financial aid, this means that UTSA electronically submits enrollment verification statuses to the NSC at several key periods during the semester to keep their enrollment status up to date with loan guarantors, services, or lenders. The NSC also provides enrollment status and deferment information to the Department of Education’s National Student Loan Data System. This service provides for more efficient processing of enrollment information for financial aid loans.

The NSC also provides enrollment and degree verification for nonlending institutions, such as travel agencies, health care companies, and prospective employers. Students who do not want to have their directory information, such as enrollment and degree status, verified in this manner should contact the Office of the Registrar to request that this information be kept confidential.

Students have the ability to request their own enrollment certificate for a health insurer or other company that requires proof of enrollment. This is done through ASAP by selecting the Student Services tab after log in.

Transcripts

Official transcripts of all coursework taken at UTSA may be requested at the Enrollment Services Center or online through ASAP.

While enrolled at UTSA, students who attend other colleges are required to submit official academic transcripts to the Office of Admissions from every college attended at the end of the semester during which coursework was undertaken, even if courses have been withdrawn. This includes concurrent enrollment while attending UTSA. Failure to do so may result in the rejection of the transcript request, cancellation of enrollment, permanent dismissal from UTSA, or other appropriate disciplinary action. Transcripts from other institutions submitted to UTSA become the property of the University and are not reproduced or mailed to other institutions, agencies, or individuals as an official transcript.

Official transcripts will not be issued for students who have a financial obligation or other commitment outstanding to the University until the obligation is cleared.

Reverse Transcripts

Texas Education Code Sec. 61.833 states that if a student transfers to a university after a lower division institution of higher education, and then earns enough credits to possibly qualify for an Associate’s degree, the university is required to send the student’s transcript to the lower division college, after permission is granted by the student to release the transcript. The lower division college will review the transcript and determine if an Associate’s degree has been earned.

To be eligible, students enrolled at a university must meet the following criteria:

  • Transferred to the university in Fall 2011 or a subsequent semester
  • Transferred from or previously attended a lower-division institution of higher education (a community college or junior college)
  • Earned at least 30 credit hours for coursework successfully completed at the lower division institution of higher education
  • The 30 credit hours must have been earned at a single lower division institution of higher education
  • Has earned a cumulative total of at least 90 credit hours for coursework
  • Students may log in to ASAP in order to grant UTSA permission to send their UTSA transcript to the lower division institution they previously attended

Release of Academic Records

All official certifications with regard to the academic performance or status of a student or former student of UTSA are made by the Office of the Registrar. Letters of Degree Completion are provided by college advising centers.

UTSA transcripts and other information from a student’s academic record are released by the Office of the Registrar only upon written request from the student or other person authorized by law under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. Exceptions may be made in response to a subpoena or court order, under other circumstances as allowed under FERPA, or as provided in the policy on releasing directory information set forth in Chapter 5, Administrative Policies and Procedures, of this bulletin.

Catalog of Graduation

Undergraduate students have seven years from their semester of original registration to complete a degree program under the catalog in effect when they initially registered. A student may choose a subsequent catalog under which to complete graduation requirements, providing the student completed at least one course during a semester in which the selected catalog was in effect with a letter grade other than “W,” “NR,” or “F.” The student must complete all degree requirements under the subsequent catalog. An academic year includes Fall, Spring and Summer semesters.

Choosing a new catalog begins a new seven-year time limit. Students who graduate under one catalog and begin a second degree must begin the new degree under the catalog in effect at that time. A student must have an approved catalog at the time an application for graduation is filed. Freshmen (students with fewer than 30 semester credit hours) who are declared majors requesting a change of catalog must do so through the Colleges’ Freshman Advising Center. Freshmen and continuing students who are undeclared majors must request a change of catalog through the Tomás Rivera Center. All other students requesting a change of catalog must do so through the advising center of the student’s major.

Change of Major, Degree, or Classification

Undergraduate students requesting to change majors or programs of study must do so through the Colleges’ Freshman Advising Center or the college advising center of the desired major or program of study. The change is not official until the advisor reviews and approves the request, preferably with the student, and makes the change in the Student Information System. Major changes are effective immediately. An undergraduate student may declare up to three majors.

Some majors have specific requirements for admission to their programs. Students should consult an academic advisor for additional information before changing majors.

Students may submit classification changes to their status as degree-seeking to non-degree-seeking at the Enrollment Services Center. The classification change form is available on the Office of Admissions Web site and the Office of the Registrar Web site. These changes, if approved by the Office of the Registrar, will be effective immediately up to Census Date. Advising fees are adjusted on classification changes up to Census Date. After Census Date, changes are effective for the next semester.

Non-degree-seeking students desiring to be regular degree-seeking students must reapply for admission and meet the same admission requirements as those listed for transfer students. Applications must be submitted in accordance with the application dates stated in this bulletin. Students wishing to change status from degree-seeking to non-degree-seeking will not have previous college transfer credit posted to the UTSA academic transcript, will not be eligible for financial aid, and do not have priority registration.

Change of Name

A student’s name on official records at UTSA is the name under which the student applied for admission, unless a Name and ID Number Change Form has been processed through the Office of the Registrar. The official University transcript will carry the current name and the most immediate previous name, if any. Name and ID Number Change Forms should be supported by appropriate legal documentation.

Change of Address

Currently enrolled students who have changed their addresses should change their mailing address with the University by accessing ASAP and following the instructions. Official notification of change of address is necessary for proper identification of student records and for accurate mailing of correspondence and information pertaining to graduation requirements. Students who are applying for graduation will specify on the Application for Graduation the address where their diploma is to be mailed. This does not change the official mailing address with the University.

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Courses

Undergraduate Classroom Course Information

Information on undergraduate classroom courses offered for credit by the University, including course syllabi and faculty curriculum vitae for each instructor, can be found at the following Web site: http://bluebook.utsa.edu.

Course Numbering System

All courses are designated by four-digit numbers following a two- or three-letter abbreviation of the subject of the course. The first digit indicates the level of the course. Courses beginning with “0” are developmental education courses and may not be counted toward a degree. Courses beginning with “1” or “2” are lower-division (freshman and sophomore level). Courses beginning with “3” or “4” are upper-division (junior and senior level). Courses beginning with a “5” or higher are graduate-level courses.

The second and third digits in the course numbers are used within the colleges by each department to distinguish individual courses. The fourth digit indicates the semester-credit-hour value of each course.

The number of lecture and laboratory contact hours per week are provided in parentheses in the course description sections of the UTSA Undergraduate Catalog and Graduate Catalog immediately following the course number and title. For example, (3-0) indicates three hours of lecture and zero hours of laboratory per week.

Common Course Numbering

UTSA is a participant in the Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS). This system provides a standard set of course descriptions to aid in the transfer of lower-division academic courses among colleges and universities in Texas. Most community colleges in Texas have adopted the TCCNS as their course numbering system; others cross-reference their courses with the TCCNS. Common courses are identified in the UTSA Undergraduate Catalog by a common TCCNS designation composed of a four-character discipline identifier and a four-digit course number.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites are stated for many courses listed in the UTSA Undergraduate Catalog. Prerequisites advise students of the background expected of all students in the course. It is the student’s responsibility to be sure that all prerequisites are met before enrolling in any course. The prerequisites for courses are those listed in the current undergraduate catalog.

The UTSA automated registration system through ASAP  will screen for designated prerequisites on specific departmental courses. Students are expected to access the prerequisite course lists through the relevant UTSA Web site, as advertised on ASAP Schedule of Classes, prior to registering for the courses to ensure that prerequisites have been completed appropriately or are currently in progress.

Under the following conditions, students may request permission from academic advisors, department chairs, associate deans, and/or instructors to register without the specified prerequisite in progress, completed, or posted in the UTSA student record system:

  • Students who have prerequisites in progress at other institutions by providing proof of course registration at the other institution.
  • Students who have completed the prerequisite course with a less than required grade and are repeating the prerequisite course (course is “in progress”).
  • Students who have completed the prerequisite course from another institution and the course has not yet been evaluated.
  • Students who have received substitution approvals.

Students are also subject to meeting the prerequisite requirements as stated for courses in the catalog and not automated in the prerequisite checking process. Students who do not meet these requirements may be dropped from the requisite courses.

Students who have registered for the requisite courses with the prerequisites currently in progress will be reviewed for satisfactory completion at the end of Fall and Spring Semesters and Summer Terms. If prerequisites are not completed satisfactorily, the requisite registered courses will be deleted from their schedules. Students will be notified of this deletion through their myUTSAmail electronic mail accounts (or the preferred e-mail account they designated in ASAP).

Extended Education Courses

The Office of Extended Education develops and presents seminars, online courses, conferences, and programs for the general public, professionals, governmental agencies, and businesses. It also provides specialized training to businesses, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations needing customized programs for employees. These courses are not offered for academic credit. For information, contact the Office of Extended Education.

Distance Learning Courses

Online courses and programs are offered and supported by individual UT institutions participating in the UT Online Consortium (UTOC). At the undergraduate level, UTSA does not participate as a host school. For information on the UTOC visit the Web site at www.utcoursesonline.org/. The Texas Information System (TIS) Web site (https://tis.telecampus.utsystem.edu/) is the central data hub for UTOC students. Students should check with their academic advisors to ensure that enrollments in UTOC courses will satisfy their degree requirements. For more information, see UT Online Consortium in Chapter 6, Academic Resources and Student Services, of this bulletin or visit the UTOC Web site.

Independent Study Courses

No more than six hours of independent study courses, regardless of discipline, will apply toward a degree. Specifically, for baccalaureate degrees, no more than a total of six hours of independent study courses will apply to a major and a minor, to a double major, or to concurrent degrees.

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Grades

Explanation of Credit, Grading System, and Symbols

Hours Attempted. The number of hours attempted is the total number of semester credit hours for which a student has enrolled and received grades of “A+,” “A,” “A-,” “B+,” “B,” “B-,” “C+,” “C,” “C-,” “D+,” “D,” “D-,” “F,” “W,” or “CR” except as provided for repeated courses.

Hours Earned.The hours earned by a student are the number of semester credit hours in which grades of “A+,” “A,” “A-,” “B+,” “B,” “B-,” “C+,” “C,” “C-,” “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “CR” have been received. Refer to the sections “Undergraduate Credit Limitation” and “Three-Attempt Rule” in this chapter, for information about the financial consequences of receiving “W” and “F” grades.

Grade Point Average.The UTSA grade point average is determined by dividing the number of grade points earned at UTSA by the number of for-credit semester credit hours attempted at UTSA. Credits and grades for work completed at other institutions, credits earned by examination, or hours in which grades of “CR” were earned are not included in the UTSA grade point average.

GPA calculations on transcripts generated after February 1, 2000, do not round up but truncate to the second decimal place (example: 3.816 truncates to 3.81 with no rounding). Before that time, grade point averages were rounded up to 1 one-hundredth of a point.

Credit courses taken through the UT Online Consortium (UTOC) count as transfer credit and apply to a UTSA degree as determined by the student’s academic advisor. At the undergraduate level, UTSA does not participate in UTOC as a host school.

The following table explains UTSA grade symbols.

Grade Symbol Grade Points Meaning of Grade Symbol
  A+ 4.00 Outstanding
A 4.00 Outstanding
 A- 3.67 Outstanding
  B+ 3.33 Above Average
B 3.00 Above Average
 B- 2.67 Above Average
  C+ 2.33 Average
C 2.00 Average
 C- 1.67 Average
  D+ 1.33 Below Average but Passing (see credit/no-credit grading policy)
D 1.00 Below Average but Passing (see credit/no-credit grading policy)
 D- 0.67 Below Average but Passing (see credit/no-credit grading policy)
F 0 Failure
CR 0 Credit. Indicates successful credit by examination or credit received under the credit/no-credit requirement or option.
NC 0 No Credit. Indicates unsuccessful credit by examination or no credit received under the credit/no-credit requirement or option.
W 0 Withdrawal. Indicates that the student dropped the course or withdrew from the University.
IN 0 Incomplete. Assigned at the discretion of the instructor; see below.
NR 0 No Report. Assigned only by the Registrar when unusual circumstances do not allow a student’s grade to be entered by the deadline for processing grades. It is replaced with the official grade as soon as possible.
EX 0 Expelled

Incomplete. The grade “IN” is given by an instructor to indicate that some part of the work of a student in a course has, for good reason, not been completed, while the remainder of the student’s work in the course was satisfactorily completed. The Incomplete allows a student to complete the course without repeating it. A student does not need to re-register for the course. A grade of Incomplete may not be assigned when a definite grade can be given for the work done. The student must have been in attendance at least three-fourths of the semester to receive a grade of “IN.”

Whenever a grade of Incomplete is assigned, the instructor is required to submit requirements for removal of the Incomplete. During the regular grading period this is done electronically. After the grade submission deadline, a Requirements for Removal of Incomplete form must be submitted with a Change of Grade form to the Dean’s office. The Dean’s office will then submit the forms to the Office of the Registrar.

In undergraduate courses, incomplete work must be made up no later than the end of the final examination period one year from the semester the Incomplete was received and before the student’s graduation. If the work is not completed within this time, the “IN” is automatically changed to a grade of “F” or “NC.”

IN NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL GRADES BE CHANGED AFTER ONE CALENDAR YEAR.

Repeating Courses

The policy for repeating courses, as stated below, only applies to courses completed and repeated at UTSA.

Courses That May Be Repeated Not Considered a Duplicate Course

Certain courses in the catalog state in their course description that they “may be repeated for credit.” These are the only courses where repeating is not a duplication. All semester credit hours and grade points from each of these courses taken are included in the student’s record.

Courses That May Be Repeated To Improve a Grade

Students may only repeat a course for credit in which they received a grade of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F.” Credit can be counted for only one of the courses. RECEIPT OF A HIGHER GRADE IN A REPEATED COURSE IN A SUBSEQUENT SEMESTER DOES NOT ALTER THE STUDENT’S ACADEMIC STANDING IN THE SEMESTER WHEN THE ORIGINAL GRADE WAS EARNED. Students may repeat any course in which they received a grade of “NC” in order to improve their grade; however, this does not alter the student’s overall grade point average.

If a student repeats a course in which he or she received a grade of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F” and receives a higher grade, the semester credit hours from the original grade of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F” are excluded from the student’s grade point average. Only the semester credit hours from the higher grade are used in calculating the grade point average. If the student earns the same grade or a lower grade, then the repeated course grade is not used in computing the grade point average. The repeated course is marked as excluded on the student’s official record. All grades remain on the student’s official academic record. This course repeat policy became effective Fall 2009.

Limitations on Repeating Courses to Improve a Grade

An undergraduate student may repeat an individual course only once in an attempt to improve a grade, and may repeat at most four courses in attempts to improve grades. For a course in which a student has received two grades of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F,” all grades earned in any subsequent enrollments in the course will be included in the computation of the student’s grade point average. For a student who already has four attempts at repeating courses to improve grades, all grades earned in any subsequent enrollments in which the student already has received grades of“D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F” will be used in the computation of the grade point average.

Courses That May Not Be Repeated To Improve a Grade

If a student repeats a course in which a grade of “A+,” “A,” “A-,” “B+,” “B,” “B-,” “C+,” “C,” “C-,” or “CR” was earned, and the course description does not indicate that the course “may be repeated for credit,” then the repeated course is marked as a duplication and the grade and semester credit hours for the repeated course are not used in the calculation of the student’s grade point average or the number of hours earned at UTSA.

Credit by Examination

A student at UTSA may, through satisfactory performance on a College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES) examinations, show knowledge of the content of an undergraduate course and be awarded credit by examination for that course. Credit by examination may be used to satisfy Core Curriculum and specific degree requirements unless specified otherwise. CLEP, AP, IB, and DANTES examinations do not exist for all curriculum courses. Students who are interested in finding out more about these tests may visit the Office of Testing Services Web site: http://utsa.edu/testing.

Courses for which students may receive credit by making a passing score on the appropriate CLEP test are marked on the class schedule in ASAP.

Credit earned by examination may not be used to satisfy minimum UTSA residence requirements (except for credits earned by challenging UTSA courses; see section on challenging courses). Credit by examination is not included in the calculation of the student’s UTSA grade point average. The symbol “CR” (Credit) is awarded for all credit earned by examination. Unsuccessful attempts to earn credit by examination do not become part of the student’s official academic record.

Credit by examination cannot duplicate or repeat credit already earned for college or university courses. Students are permitted to receive credit by examination (including CLEP credit) for courses in which they have received grades of “F,” “NC” or “W” (and have no other grade for those courses) since these grades do not represent hours earned. Students may not receive credit for a course for which credit by examination has already been awarded. It is not necessary to be a UTSA student to take credit by examination; however, credit is not awarded unless the individual is a current or former UTSA student, including a newly admitted and registered UTSA student. Credit for a given exam is awarded based on the date tested, not undergraduate catalog term. If the score requirements change prior to a student’s test date, the new changes are effective for the student’s results. For students who have earned credits at UTSA, credit by examination is awarded by logging into the ASAP student account to verify acceptance of each credit, with the exception of POL 1013, for which Advanced Placement (AP) credit or CLEP credit can be earned only after the student has completed POL 1133. Other exceptions for certain course credits can be found in the footnotes below the UTSA credit table on the Office of Testing Services Web site at http://utsa.edu/testing.

Information on credit by examination at UTSA is available on the Office of Testing Services Web site. It describes the various tests that may be accepted for credit at the University, the types of tests available, when and where they are given, their costs, procedures for having test scores submitted for consideration for credit, the amount of credit that may be earned, and how to obtain additional information on each test.

Posting Credit Earned By Examination to Transcripts

UTSA posts credit by examination to a student’s transcript only when the student expressly requests to have those credits posted. Students should log into ASAP, select Student Services and click on the link Student Records. From Student Records select Accept AP/CLEP Credit.

Challenging a UTSA Course

Students enrolled at UTSA may “challenge,” or request an examination in any UTSA undergraduate course for which they have not already received credit. Not all courses, however, consist of materials in which comprehension can be evaluated by means of examination. The option of whether or not to grant the request rests with the instructor of the course and may be further limited by policies set by the college in which the course is offered.

Credits earned by challenging UTSA undergraduate courses by examination apply to degree requirements as though the courses had been completed in the normal manner, except that since a grade of “CR” is awarded, such courses are not included in the UTSA grade point average. These credits are also counted toward the minimum UTSA residence requirements. Students may challenge the same UTSA course only once.

To challenge a UTSA undergraduate course, the student must enroll in the course and request the challenge examination from the instructor. A Challenge Examination Request form must be filed with the Office of the Registrar, and the test must be administered within the first three weeks of a Fall or Spring Semester or the first week of a five- or 10-week Summer Term.

If the student’s performance on the examination is at the grade level of “C-” or higher, a grade of “CR” is submitted at the end of the semester by the instructor for the course. Unsuccessful attempts to earn credit by challenge examination do not become part of the student’s official academic record.

Students who fail the challenge examination must either drop the course or complete the course on a regular basis following the evaluation of the examination for the course challenged. Students who complete coursework on a credit-by-examination basis are graded on a credit/no-credit basis. Therefore, if a student elects to complete the course, the instructor must notify the Office of the Registrar in writing to remove the credit/no-credit grading option by the Automatic “W” Date.

Students admitted under the Provisional Admission Program may request to challenge courses by examination in those disciplines to which their enrollment is restricted. However, credit earned by examination does not fulfill the minimum of 18 college-level semester credit hours that must be successfully completed under the Provisional Admission Program.

Credit/No-Credit Option

Mandatory Credit/No-Credit Courses. Some degree programs will require certain courses to be graded on a mandatory credit/no-credit basis. Such requirements are noted in UTSA Undergraduate Catalog course descriptions. Programs offering mandatory credit/no-credit courses will allow a number of such courses to apply to the major, minor, support work, or free electives, as specified by each program in its UTSA Undergraduate Catalog degree requirements.

Optional Credit/No-Credit Grading. Undergraduate students are also allowed the option of credit/no-credit grading in courses that are otherwise subject to regular grading. This option is provided to encourage undergraduate students to expand their knowledge of fields outside their major areas of interest. The following guidelines apply:

  • A maximum of 24 semester credit hours may be attempted on an optional credit/no-credit basis.
  • Credit/no-credit courses appear on the permanent record as a grade of “CR” if the student’s grade is an “A+,” “A,” “A-,” “B+,” “B,” “B-,” “C+,” “C,” “C-,” “D+,” “D,” or “D-” or as a grade of “NC” if the student’s grade is “F.” Neither grade will affect the student’s grade point average at UTSA. The credit/no-credit grade cannot be changed to a regular grade once the credit has been awarded.
  • Students who choose to take the course on an optional credit/no-credit basis must submit a Credit/No-Credit Option Request form at the Enrollment Services Center prior to the end of the eighth week of the Fall and Spring Semesters. Information on deadlines for Summer Terms or for Fall and Spring Semesters can be found in the Academic Calendar and in the online registration calendar for each semester. After the deadline, students will not be allowed to add the credit/no-credit option or remove the option and take the course on a regular basis.
  • Only free electives may be taken on an optional credit/no-credit basis. Courses to be applied to the Core Curriculum or to major, minor, or support work must be taken on a regular or mandatory credit/no-credit basis as specified in Undergraduate Catalog degree requirements.
  • Transfer students who transfer to UTSA for their last 30 semester credit hours may not count optional credit/no-credit courses toward their 30-hour minimum UTSA residency requirement.
  • The Office of the Registrar requires students to affirm by signature that they understand the credit/no-credit policies and agree to abide by them.
  • The student’s academic advisor must approve the Credit/No-Credit Option Request form.
  • Courses taken for credit/no-credit may not count toward the 45 hours required for University Latin Honors.
  • A course taken for credit/no-credit may not replace a letter grade.
  • The credit/no-credit option is not available if the student has previously received a letter grade.

Note: Some graduate schools place students who have taken courses on a credit/no-credit basis at a disadvantage in computing grade point averages for admission; however, graduate admission committees in some disciplines may look favorably on learning accomplished in credit/no-credit courses.

Administrative Procedures

Reporting of Grades by Faculty

Final grades are reported by course instructors every semester and are due 48 hours after the final examination. Final grades cannot be withheld nor can reporting of them be deferred.

Early grade reports are required for all freshmen. Faculty members are required to report early grades seven weeks into the semester during the Fall and Spring Semesters. Additionally, early grade reports are required for all other undergraduates whose course performance at the time early reports are submitted is at the level of a grade of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F.” Freshmen receiving early grade reports of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F” are required to participate in a midterm academic assistance program and to see an advisor in their advising center. Freshmen with undeclared majors who receive early grade reports of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F” are required to participate in the Tomás Rivera Center (TRC) program and see an advisor to develop a plan to improve their grades. Freshmen with declared majors who receive grades of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” or “F” are required to participate in the Colleges’ Freshman Advising Center program and to see an advisor to develop a plan to improve their grades.

Grade Reports

The Office of the Registrar compiles final grades after the close of each semester and each summer term. Grades are available in ASAP. Students who are removed from, placed on, or continued on academic warning or academic probation, and students who are dismissed from UTSA, will receive notification from the Office of the Registrar.

Transcripts may be withheld from any student who owes tuition and fees to the University. Grades and transcripts may be withheld from any freshman who has not completed the AlcoholEdu program.

Change of Grades

Grade changes from “IN” (Incomplete) to a letter grade must be made no later than the end of the final examination period, one year from the semester the Incomplete was received, and before the student’s graduation. An undergraduate student cannot graduate with an “IN” on his or her record. If the student wishes to graduate and if the course is not needed for a degree requirement, the “IN” will have to convert to an “F” regardless of whether a year has passed or not. The instructor must submit either an online Change of Grade or a paper Change of Grade Form to the office of the Dean. The college will file the paper form with the Office of the Registrar. Courses with an “IN” grade that have not been changed by the deadline will automatically be converted to a grade of “F.”

All other grade changes must be initiated by the instructor. All requests for a change of grade should include a statement explaining the requested change. It is the policy to change a grade (other than Incomplete) only in the case of error. Additional work performed by a student may not be used to raise a grade that has been reported to the Office of the Registrar. A request for a change of grade using the paper form requires the approval of the Chair of the department in which the course is offered and the Dean of the college. The college will file the form with the Office of the Registrar before the Registrar will make the change in the student’s record. Online change of grades are subject to review by the Chair of the department and the Dean of the college.

IN NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL GRADES BE CHANGED AFTER ONE CALENDAR YEAR.

Class Participation Policy

Students are expected to regularly attend and participate in all meetings of courses for which they are registered. The instructor is responsible for communicating the participation requirements for each course to students. With the exception of UTSA policies on class absences related to observance of religious holy days, active military service, or attendance at an official University-sanctioned student activity, the instructor determines classroom participation requirements and policies on making up work missed during an absence.

Students may be excused from attending classes or other required activities, including examinations, to attend an official University-sanctioned student activity (as defined in the Handbook of Operating Procedures) or for the observance of a religious holy day, including travel for that purpose. A religious holy day is a day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under § 11.20, Tax Code. A student whose absence is excused for attending an official University-sanctioned student activity or for religious holy day reasons may not be penalized for the absence and shall be allowed by the instructor to take an examination or complete an assignment from which the student is excused within a reasonable time after the absence.

Students may be excused from attending classes or engaging in other required activities, including examinations, in order for the student to participate in active military service to which the student is called, including travel associated with the service. A student whose absence is excused under the Texas Education Code, § 51.9111, may not be penalized for the absence and shall be allowed by the instructor to complete an assignment or take an examination from which the student is excused within reasonable time after the absence. The excused absence is permitted only if the student will not miss more than twenty-five percent of the total number of class meetings or the contact hour equivalent (not including the final examination period) for the specific course or courses in which the student is enrolled at the beginning of the period of active military service (19 Texas Administrative Code, § 4.9).

If a student has to miss class excessively due to illness or other unforeseen circumstances, it is his or her responsibility to notify the instructor as soon as possible. A student who enrolls in a course and does not attend is considered absent from class until they officially drop the course. A student who does not attend class and fails to drop the course by the specified deadline listed in the online registration calendar will receive a grade of “F.” Refer to the sections “Undergraduate Credit Limitation” and “Three-Attempt Rule” in this chapter for information about the financial consequences of receiving “W” or “F” grades.

Academic and Grade Grievance Procedure

In resolving any student grievance regarding grades, evaluations or other academically-related concern or incident regarding a faculty member, the student must first make a serious effort to resolve the matter with the faculty member with whom the grievance originated. It is University policy that individual faculty members retain primary responsibility for assigning grades and evaluations. The faculty member’s judgment regarding grades and evaluations is final unless compelling evidence shows discrimination, differential treatment, factual mistake, or violation of a relevant University policy. In resolving a student grievance regarding other academically-related issues involving a faculty member, the student must follow the same process as used when grieving a grade or evaluation. If the matter is not resolved, the student may file a formal grievance, in writing, with the Department Chair. The student must file the grievance with the Department Chair within 90 calendar days from the end of the semester in which the grade was assigned or the other concern or incident occurred.

The Department Chair will communicate his or her decision to the student and forward a copy to the Dean of the college. The student may appeal the decision to the Dean of the college and then, if an undergraduate student, to the Dean of University College, and if a graduate student, to the Dean of the Graduate School. Appeals must be submitted on the Student Academic and Grade Grievance Form. The decisions of the Deans of University College and the Graduate School are final. The administrator handling the appeal at each level will notify individuals involved, including those who have already ruled on the appeal, once a decision has been rendered.

IN NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL GRADES BE CHANGED AFTER ONE CALENDAR YEAR.

Student Study Days

At the end of each Fall and Spring Semester, the two days prior to the beginning of the final examination period are designated as Student Study Days. Classes do not meet during Student Study Days. Furthermore, Student Study Days are not to be used as dates on which papers are to be turned in, examinations are to be given, quizzes are to be scheduled, review sessions are to be held, or for any other class-related activities, other than office hours. There are no Student Study Days during the Summer Semester.

President’s List, Dean’s List, and Honor Roll

President’s List. Undergraduate students who achieve scholastic distinction in a semester, as evidenced by a grade point average of 4.0 in at least 15 semester credit hours in a Fall or Spring semester, or at least 12 semester credit hours in a Summer semester, excluding grades of “CR,” and who receive no grades of “IN” or “NC.”

Dean’s List. Undergraduate students who achieve scholastic distinction in a semester, as evidenced by a grade point average of 3.75 to 3.99 in at least 15 semester credit hours in a Fall or Spring semester, or at least 12 semester credit hours in a Summer semester, excluding grades of “CR,” and who receive no grades of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” “F,” “IN,” or “NC.”

Honor Roll. Undergraduate students who achieve scholastic distinction in a semester, as evidenced by a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in at least 9 semester credit hours in a Fall, Spring, or Summer semester, excluding grades of “CR,” and who receive no grades of “D+,” “D,” “D-,” “F,” “IN,” or “NC.”

Part time Dean's list and part time Honor Roll are no longer recognized. In a given semester, a student will be recognized for only the highest of the above honors for which he or she qualifies.

To determine eligibility for graduation with honors, see Graduation with University Latin Honors in this chapter.

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Academic Standing

Minimum Grade Requirements

Students are expected to maintain a level of scholastic achievement that allows them to meet the grade requirements for graduation. Students remain in good standing when they maintain a UTSA grade point average of 2.0 or higher. Students who fail to maintain the minimum required grade point average of 2.0 in all work attempted at UTSA will be placed on academic warning, academic probation, or academic dismissal as appropriate. Students seeking degrees in the College of Business or the College of Engineering, or planning to major in Biology, should refer to the UTSA Undergraduate Catalog for additional minimum grade requirements.

Academic Warning

First-time undergraduates at UTSA, including transfer students, who were admitted in good standing and earn a semester grade point average between 1.0 and 1.99 during their first semester at UTSA are placed on academic warning. New provisional students and students admitted on academic probation are not eligible for the academic warning status.

First-time undergraduates at UTSA, including transfer students, who were admitted in good standing and have a semester grade point average below 1.0 during their first semester are placed on academic probation and bypass the academic warning status completely.

Students on academic warning must be advised prior to registration to help ensure their academic success. Freshmen who have declared majors are advised in the Colleges’ Freshman Advising Center (CFAC). Students who have earned 30 or more semester credit hours and have declared majors are advised in the advising center of the college of their major. Students who are undecided are advised in the Tomás Rivera Center (TRC).

At the end of their second semester of registration at UTSA, the academic standing of students on academic warning will be changed to good standing if their overall UTSA grade point average rises to at least 2.0 or their academic standing will be changed to academic probation if their overall UTSA grade point average remains below 2.0.

Students on academic warning may enroll in no more than 13 semester credit hours in a Fall or Spring Semester and no more than 7 semester credit hours in a Summer Semester. Students on academic warning during a Spring Semester may not enroll in the following May Mini-mester.

Academic Probation

Students in good standing (as defined above) whose overall UTSA grade point average falls below 2.0 (other than first-time undergraduates who meet the criteria for academic warning) are placed on academic probation. Academic probation will be cleared when a student achieves a 2.0 overall UTSA grade point average.

Students placed on academic probation must make a semester grade point average of 2.0 or above in each semester of probation in order to remain enrolled. Students on academic probation whose semester grade point average is below 2.0 will be placed on academic dismissal, even if their overall UTSA grade point average is above 2.0.

Students on academic probation must be advised prior to registration to help ensure their academic success. At that time, the student and the advisor will develop a remedial plan specifying expectations the student will be required to meet during the semester. Students who do not follow this plan will be subject to academic dismissal.

Students cannot graduate while on academic probation.

Students on academic probation may enroll in no more than 13 semester credit hours in a Fall or Spring Semester and no more than 7 semester credit hours in a Summer Semester. Students on academic probation during a Spring Semester may not enroll in the following May Mini-mester.

Academic Dismissal and Reinstatement Policy and Procedures

Students on academic probation who earn a semester grade point average below 2.0 will be placed on academic dismissal. There are three types of academic dismissal, each of which is described below.

If students believe there are nonacademic, extenuating circumstances that contributed to their inability to do well academically, they may appeal their dismissal. Students with declared majors may appeal the decision through the Dean’s Office of the college of their major or if students are undeclared or undecided, the Tomás Rivera Center.

First Academic Dismissal. Students, other than those classified as provisional students, who are placed on academic dismissal for the first time will be reinstated if they so choose after not attending UTSA for the next regular semester (Fall, Spring, or entire Summer Semester). Students seeking reinstatement must apply for admission with the Admissions Office by July 1 for Fall Semester, November 15 for the Spring Semester, and May 1 for the Summer Semester. Students on academic dismissal from UTSA may attend other institutions and transfer appropriate coursework completed to UTSA, but grades earned cannot count toward or be used to improve their UTSA grade point average. If a student does enroll at another institution, an admission decision will be made upon receipt of an official transcript that reflects grades on coursework taken at that institution during the period of dismissal from UTSA.

Typically, a student subject to dismissal will be dismissed; however, each UTSA college has an appeals procedure administered by the college. A student who wishes to appeal a dismissal should contact the student’s advising center for procedures and deadlines. In unusual circumstances, a student may be allowed to continue subject to conditions prescribed by the Dean.

Subsequent Academic Dismissal. Students placed on academic dismissal for a second or subsequent time may be reinstated after not attending UTSA for one calendar year with the approval of the reinstatement committee in the college of the student’s major. Reinstatement decisions for students without a declared major are determined by a reinstatement committee based in the Tomás Rivera Center. Each of these committees reports to a college Dean or Dean of University College who has final authority for determinations of reinstatements.

Students seeking reinstatement must apply for admission to the Admissions Office and pay the reinstatement fee. The application for admission may be filed online. In addition to the application and fee payment, the applicant must complete a petition packet. The packet, including instructions, may be found on the Admissions Web site. The application, reinstatement fee, petition form and all required supporting documentation must be on file in the Admissions Office by June 15 for the Fall Semester; October 15 for the Spring Semester; and March 15 for the Summer Semester, to be considered by the appropriate reinstatement committee. The reinstatement committee’s decision, and any conditions of the decision, will be communicated to the applicant by the reinstatement committee. Students on academic dismissal from UTSA may attend other institutions and transfer appropriate coursework completed to UTSA, but grades earned cannot count toward or be used to improve their UTSA grade point average.

Provisional Academic Dismissal. Provisionally admitted students who are placed on academic dismissal must attend another college or university and complete a minimum of 12 semester credits of transferable college coursework with a minimum 2.25 grade point average to qualify for reinstatement to UTSA. Provisionally admitted students who have been dismissed, met these qualifications, and wish to be reinstated should apply for admission with the Admissions Office by July 1 for the Fall Semester, November 15 for the Spring Semester, and May 1 for the Summer Semester. The application for admission may be filed online.

Procedures and Requirements Following Petitions for Reinstatement

If the reinstatement committee in the college of the student’s major or the reinstatement committee based in the Tomás Rivera Center (for students without a declared major) approves the Petition for Reinstatement, the Office of Admissions will process the application for admission for the requested semester of enrollment. If the petition for reinstatement is disapproved, a student may not file another petition until the following semester. Appeal of a denial for reinstatement may be made to the Dean of University College within two weeks after notice of the denial is postmarked. The decision of the Dean of University College is final.

All students who are reinstated from academic dismissal are placed on academic probation and must maintain a minimum semester 2.0 grade point average every semester until they reach a UTSA cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Students who have been reinstated following an academic dismissal must be advised prior to registration. At that time, the student and the advisor will develop a remedial plan specifying expectations the student will be required to meet during the semester. Students who fail to follow the requirements set by the Dean or the Tomás Rivera Center will be subject to academic dismissal.

Advising for Reinstated Students

Students are ultimately responsible for knowing and meeting degree requirements, for enrolling in appropriate courses to ensure orderly and timely completion of their degree programs, and for following the rules and policies of UTSA as found in the UTSA catalog, the current UTSA Information Bulletin, and online schedule of classes. Each advising center sees students concerning all matters of their academic status, such as progress toward degree completion, graduation status, academic probation, academic dismissal, and changing majors. Students who are on academic probation who are reinstated after academic dismissal, or who have a Texas Success Initiative (TSI) deficiency are required to be advised and holds are placed on their registration records to ensure that the student meets with an advisor. Students may also be required to meet with an advisor to obtain approval to register for restricted courses.

Freshmen (fewer than 30 earned semester credit hours) who have declared majors are advised in the Colleges’ Freshman Advising Center (CFAC). Freshmen and continuing students who are undecided and those who are provisional are advised in the Tomás Rivera Center (TRC). Students who have earned 30 or more semester credit hours and have declared majors are advised through the college advising centers of their major(s). Students may also need to consult with the Honors College, Athletics program, advisors in colleges which offer secondary certifications or if seeking a major/minor outside their primary major, advisors within that college.

Graduation

Graduation Dates

Degrees are awarded at the end of each Fall, Spring, and Summer semester. All degree requirements must be completed on or before the end of the term. Commencement ceremonies are held in December and May at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters. Students who graduate at the end of the Summer Semester may participate in either the May or the December commencement ceremony.

Information regarding Graduation and Commencement is available at http://utsa.edu/registrar/graduation.cfm.

Applying for the Degree

It is the student’s responsibility to officially apply for his or her degree by submitting an Application for Graduation online through ASAP. Students must have earned at least 90 semester credit hours to apply online for graduation. Students must read and follow instructions carefully to ensure the application is accurate and successfully submitted. When the application has been accepted, students receive a confirmation number. Students having problems submitting the application should contact Graduation Coordination at graduationcoordination@utsa.edu.

While enrolled at UTSA, students who attend other colleges are required to submit official academic transcripts to the Office of Admissions from every college attended at the end of the semester during which coursework was undertaken, even if courses have been withdrawn. This includes concurrent enrollment while attending UTSA. Failure to do so may result in the rejection of the graduation application, cancellation of enrollment, permanent dismissal from UTSA, or other appropriate disciplinary action.

The following are deadlines for submitting an application for graduation:

  • April 15 for Fall Semester graduation
  • November 15 for Spring Semester graduation
  • June 15 for Summer Semester graduation
    • Summer candidates wishing to participate in the May ceremony must apply by February 15.

Students applying to graduate with multiple degrees, majors, concentrations, and/or minors may not apply online; they must download and print the application from the Office of the Registrar Student Forms Web site, then submit the completed application to the Enrollment Services Center.

The college advising center(s) in which the student is enrolled is responsible for auditing the student’s degree plan. Students must apply one semester prior to the intended graduation semester to ensure that all degree requirements are met. Students should contact the college advising center of their major for more information.

If all University-wide and degree program requirements have been satisfied, an undergraduate student is not required to be registered for classes during the semester in which they apply for graduation.

Letters of Degree Completion are prepared by the student’s college advising center up to the close of the End of Term date of the semester in which all degree requirements have been met.

Degrees are posted to transcripts within 30 days of the End of Term date for the semester of graduation and diplomas are mailed within 45 days of the End of Term.

Degree Verification

Graduation verification is a two-step process.

  1. The college advising center of the student’s degree/major/minor does a preliminary verification. The student is responsible for completing all coursework and submitting any or all of the following to his or her college advising center by the end of the term (see the Academic Calendar for End of Term dates) in which graduation is expected:

    • Outstanding transcripts
    • CLEP, AP, and IB credit
    • Petitions or substitutions
    • Change of major/minor
    • Change of catalog

  2. A final degree verification occurs once all grades are posted for the graduation semester; the degree plan is reviewed by the student’s college advising center once again and the college Dean authorizes the certification for graduation.

Students who apply for the degree in a given semester but do not fulfill all requirements must file a new Application for Graduation on or before the appropriate deadline for the next semester in which they intend to graduate.

Applying for an Undergraduate Certificate

It is the student’s responsibility to apply for his or her certificate by submitting a completed Application for Undergraduate Certificate to the Enrollment Services Center prior to the last day of the semester of graduation. The application form is located at http://utsa.edu/registrar/forms.html. Students with questions about the application should contact Graduation Coordination at graduationcoordination@utsa.edu.

Graduation with University Latin Honors

Students may graduate with University Latin Honors provided they complete a minimum of 45 semester credit hours at UTSA by the time of graduation (excluding courses challenged by examination or taken on a credit/no-credit basis in which only the symbol “CR” is recorded) and meet the following requirements:

  • Undergraduate students who earn a 3.5 to 3.74 grade point average in all semester credit hours attempted at UTSA are eligible for graduation cum laude.

  • Those who earn a 3.75 to 3.89 grade point average in all semester credit hours attempted at UTSA are eligible for graduation magna cum laude.

  • Those who earn at least a 3.9 grade point average in all semester credit hours attempted at UTSA are eligible for graduation summa cum laude.

No degree candidate shall be eligible for graduation with University Latin Honors if, at the time of graduation, disciplinary action has been taken against the student by the University.

Master’s and doctoral degree candidates are not eligible for University Latin Honors.

Commencement Honors

Students may receive honors at Commencement if they have completed at least 45 hours with the above grade point average requirements at the time of the ceremony.

Academic Honesty

Ethical Standards

The University can best function and accomplish its objectives in an atmosphere of high ethical standards. All students are expected and encouraged to contribute to such an atmosphere in every way possible, especially by observing all accepted principles of academic honesty. It is recognized, however, that a large university will include a few students who do not understand, appreciate, or practice these principles. Consequently, alleged cases of academic dishonesty involving UTSA students will inevitably occur.

Academic or scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student, or the attempt to commit such acts. Academic dishonesty is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct and is addressed in Appendix B, Sec. 203 of this bulletin.

Students are not at liberty to disregard previous college work attempted. All students transferring to UTSA must list all colleges attended on their UTSA application for admission. While enrolled at UTSA, students who attend other colleges are required to submit official academic transcripts to the Office of Admissions from every college attended at the end of the semester during which coursework was undertaken, even if coursework has been withdrawn. This includes concurrent enrollment while attending UTSA. Failure to do so may result in the rejection of the admission application, withdrawal of any offer of acceptance, cancellation of enrollment, permanent dismissal from UTSA, or other appropriate disciplinary action.

Fraudulent Degrees

Under Chapter 61, Subchapter G, of the Texas Education Code, it is illegal to use a fraudulent or substandard degree for gaining admission into an educational program, presenting oneself to the public as an expert, gaining employment or promotion, or gaining a governmental position with authority over others. Violation of this subchapter is a misdemeanor and falls under the Deceptive Trade Practices Act.

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