Which classes will I be enrolled in summer 2022?

As part of the program, LEAD students will take two courses with other LEAD students. This will allow LEAD participants the opportunity to create study groups, work on projects together, and support each other through their summer coursework.

Academic Advisors will guide students towards the best course options. Students will meet with their academic advisors during orientation.

Below are course options:

  • AIS 1203 - Academic Inquiry and Scholarship***
  • HIS 1043 - US History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War
  • HIS 1053 - US History: Civil War Era to Present
  • POL 1013 - Intro to American Politics
  • POL 1133 - Texas Politics and Society
  • WRC 1013 - Freshman Composition I
***All LEAD students will be placed in AIS 1203 along with one other core curriculum course

 


Course Descriptions

The following are course descriptions for the courses offered to LEAD Summer Academy students. Students who choose to participate will take two first-year summer courses together.

AIS 1203-Academic Inquiry and Scholarship

3 Credit Hours

This course develops critical thinking, communication, social responsibility, and leadership skills. This course also provides an opportunity for students to better understand the core values, cultures, and assumptions within fields of study through involvement in a signature experience within an academic pathway.


HIS 1043-United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War

3 Credit Hours

From a variety of perspectives, this course will analyze topics covering the geography of North America; pre-Columbian societies; European colonial societies and their transition into the national period; the development of modern economic structures and political traditions; westward expansion; class, race, ethnicity, and gender; cultural diversity and national unity; the relations of the United States to other nations and cultures; and the impact of these trends and issues on the development of the nation. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History.


HIS 1053-United States History: Civil War Era to Present

3 Credit Hours

From a variety of perspectives, this course will analyze topics covering the development of the United States as an urban industrial nation; the rising importance of the business cycle, corporations, and immigration; political traditions; class, race, ethnicity, and gender; cultural diversity and national unity; the relationship between the United States and other nations and cultures; and the impact of these trends on the development of the nation. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History.


POL 1013-Introduction to American Politics

3 Credit Hours

This course is an introduction to the structure and workings of American government. The course focuses mainly on how the national government functions in a divided, federal system of government that still leaves much in the hands of state and local governments, or the people themselves.


POL 1133-Texas Politics and Society

3 Credit Hours

This course involves the analysis of Texas government institutions, political behavior, civic engagement and their political and philosophical foundations. Topics may include discussions of the Texas and U.S. Constitutions; the role of state in the federal system; the diverse demographic, economic, and cultural bases of state politics; elections, interest groups, and elites; and legislative, executive, judicial, urban, and county politics. Considerable time is devoted to thinking about how these components fit together, and how they shape the nature and importance of citizenship and civic engagement in Texas. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Government-Political Science


WRC 1013-Freshman Composition I

3 Credit Hours

Freshman Composition I, an informative writing course, focuses on developing and expressing ideas clearly and effectively. Students learn to communicate with professional and academic audiences through written, oral, and visual methods by means of individual and team projects. Students review principles of the writing process, including planning, organization, development, revision, and editing. They are also introduced to rhetorical techniques and quantitative literacy. Students critically read and analyze primary and secondary texts to use in developing writing skills through practice with summary and paraphrase, analysis, and synthesis of multiple sources. The course offers students opportunities to reflect on their work, engage in library research, and practice ethical decision-making through responsible selection, use, and documentation of sources